How to Refinish a Bathtub

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with Rustoleum's Tub and Tile Refinishing Kit. Prep work is key in this project, and this detailed tutorial will ensure you do a thorough job!

When I first moved into my current home, I was legitimately scared of showering in my downstairs bathtub/shower. It had stains...

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

chips...

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

holes...

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

and a corroded drain.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

A thorough cleaning job made me feel a bit better, better enough that I started showering in it, but it still looked disgusting.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

Fast-forward two years. The bathtub is still stained, chipped, and corroded, but now I'm about to sell the house. While this bathtub apparently didn't stop me from buying, it was scary enough that I'd believe it'd stop somebody. So I set out to make it better.

How to Refinish a Bathtub -
An Overview

I decided to use Rustoleum's Tub and Tile Refinishing Kit to paint the bathtub. Thing to know: painting is the fast part. You will spend the majority of the time prepping to paint your tub. 

To give you an idea, I spent a full eight hours prepping the tub and tile for paining. That's right. Eight hours. The actual painting part only took around 30 minutes a coat.

The general process goes like this:

  1. Repair chips and holes.
  2. Wash with a bleach and water mixture.
  3. Scrub with abrasive cleaner.
  4. Remove any caulk.
  5. Scrub with abrasive pad and lime away.
  6. Sand with 400-600 grit wet/dry sandpaper. Rinse to remove residue.
  7. Remove drain. Clean and sand area around/under drain.
  8. Mask with painter's tape.
  9. Wipe with tack cloth.
  10. Paint (finally.)
  11. Wait a few days.
  12. Reapply caulk and reinstall drain.

The reviews on Amazon were incredibly informative, and my general takeaway was that this stuff will only work if the prep work is well done. Otherwise, it bubbles up instead of sticking to the tub. So as you might expect, I was super careful to make sure everything was done properly.

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

Materials

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

Special Note: There are a ton of materials for this project! Be sure to grab our FREE Materials Checklist so that you know you have everything you need!

For Prep Work
For Painting
  • Rustoleum Tub and Tile Refinishing Kit -  I used two kits to apply three coats of paint on my bathtub and surrounding tile. If you're unsure of how much you'll need, buy your kits in-person at Home Depot or Lowes, and buy more than you think you need. Then you can return what you don't use. (Amazon does not accept returns on chemical products like this.)
  • 4" Kitchen and Bath Roller
  • Extra Roller Refills - This pack of 10 was more than enough for my three coats. People on Amazon mentioned that the paint caused their rollers to disintegrate. These didn't disintegrate, but after awhile the pressure from the metal roller caused the foam to break in half.
  • Foam Brushes - For small areas that can't be reached by the rollers. 
For Finishing Touches
Tools Used
  • Orbital Sander - I woodwork sometimes, so I have a pretty nice orbital sander that I used on this project. If you don't have a sander, and don't plan to get into woodworking anytime soon, I'd still recommend picking up a cheapo one at Harbor Freight for this project. It made sanding go a lot faster, and frankly, did a better job than I could have done hand-sanding.
  • Drill/Driver and Drill Brush - I used this in combo with my abrasive cleaner. Once again, I already had the drill brush, but it made me more confident that I was prepping thoroughly.
  • Caulk Remover
Safety Equipment
  • Respirator - This stuff is strong, and even with a fan going you will want to wear a respirator. I love the one I have, but it's no longer available, so you're on your own for this.
  • Window Fan- I didn't realize how well this was working until I turned it off at the end of the day, and was immediately assaulted with strong paint fumes. 
  • Latex Gloves - True Confession #2: I didn't wear gloves. This was a mistake. I had paint on my hands for days.

How to Paint a Bathtub

Step 1: Repair Any Chips

I used WaterWeld, an epoxy putty, to fill the chips in the bathtub. It dries to an off-white, which was one of the main reasons I picked it. Some of the other options dried gray, which I was afraid wouldn't be easily covered by the paint.

To use the putty, I kneaded it with my fingers, then pushed it into and around the chips. I tried to smooth it out as best I could, but it was still a little bumpy when I was done. This isn't a big deal - once dry, the putty is sandable, and will be smoothed out when sanding the bathtub later.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY
Step 2: Wash With a Bleach and Water Solution

Nowhere in Rustoleum's instructions does it tell you how much bleach should be in your solution, so I went with the formula on the bleach container: 1/2 cup bleach to 1 gallon water. In practice, this ended up being a little bit of bleach added to an almost full spray bottle.

I think the purpose of this step was to kill/remove any mildew. I didn't really notice it doing anything, but I am a rule follower, so I washed everything (both the tile and bathtub) anyway.

At this point, my bathtub looks pretty much exactly the same.

Step 3: Scrub With Abrasive Cleaner

My general process was as follows: 1) Spray tile/tub with water, 2) Shake some Barkeeper's friend onto the drill brush, 3) Scrub the tile/tub with drill brush.

This actually did something visible; all the discoloration on the tile scrubbed off! At the end of this step, I actually debated if I should paint the tile at all. However - the drill brush/barkeepers friend combo is super abrasive, so it's possible I damaged the finish of the tile with this step. I figured it was better to paint it than leave damaged tile behind.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY
Step 4: Remove Caulk

I was a little worried that this would be difficult, but the caulk remover tool I purchased was super sharp, and cut right through the caulk. Once it was started, it pulled right up.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

I didn't worry about the small bits the main piece of caulk had left behind; they were scrubbed and sanded off in the next two steps.

Step 5: Scrub With Lime-Away and Abrasive Pad

I went pretty slowly on this step, since I was doing it by hand I wanted to make sure I was thorough. One thing I noticed was that the lime-away appeared to leave a thin film on my tiles once it dried. This sanded off in the next step anyway, so it wasn't a big deal, but it was a frustrating at the time, since I was trying to clean the tiles, not make them worse.

Step 6: Sand with 400-600 Grit Wet/Dry Sandpaper

This step is super important in that it ensures your tub is scratchy enough for the paint to stick to it. I went slowly even with the orbital sander in order to make sure every bit was completely sanded.

Earlier I mentioned that the lime-away formed a film on top of the tile. It was clogging up my sandpaper, so I switched to a lower grit so that my paper got clogged less often. I think I ultimately was sanding with 180 grit sandpaper. Nothing terrible seemed to happen.

I sanded the tub/tile until it was no longer clogging up my 400 grit paper. As you might expect, this took awhile. Once I was done, I rinsed the tile and tub to remove any dust.

Step 7: Remove Drain

To remove the drain, I used a pair of pliers to grip the cross in my tub drain. Then I used another set of pliers to gain leverage to turn and unscrew the drain.

I was worried this was going to be super difficult, and that I wouldn't be able to get enough leverage to turn the drain. Turns out, it wasn't hard at all.

I'll also mention that Rustoleum puts this step at the beginning of the process. I noted that there were a couple times I had to rinse the tub, and decided to wait to remove the drain until after I was done rinsing. This turned out to be a good decision, because about 10 minutes after I removed the drain, the pipe underneath it sagged a few inches, disconnecting from the tub.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY
Step 8: Mask With Painter's Tape

The paint is really difficult to remove once it's on, so make sure anything you don't want to paint gets covered. This includes the perimeter of the tub, as well as any fixtures inside the tub.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

I also wrapped some plastic wrap around the faucet. It doesn't really drip, but I could feel some water there, so I figured better safe than sorry!

Step 8: Wipe With Tack Cloth

So, I actually broke up this project into two days; the first for prep, and the second for painting. I actually left this step for painting day, because it needs to be done right before the paint is applied. 

The goal with the tack cloth is to remove any last minute dust that settles on the tub. Also, I'm not really sure what a tack cloth is. I used a microfiber cloth. Nobody died.

Step 9: Prep the Fan

The fan was a major win. Don't get me wrong, I could still smell the paint, but it was manageable. When I turned the fan off in the evening, I was assulted by epoxy paint smell immediately. I hadn't realized what a difference it was making until I turned it off.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

I'll also mention that I did this project in February, and on the day I painted it was a high of 44 degrees (Fahrenheit) outside. Because the fan blew the air out of the bathroom, my bathroom remained around 70 degrees. This was particularly important, since the paint must be at least 65 degrees to work.

My heating bill for that day will be atrocious, I'm sure. But I have a painted bathtub, and that's all that really matters.

Step 10: Mix the Paint

The paint comes in two cans - "Part B" is the primary paint, while "Part A" is the activator. There is enough space in Part B to mix the two cans together.

I slowly poured Part A into Part B a little at a time, and mixed until Part A was completely absorbed. This might take a little while, so mix more than you think you need to in order to ensure Part A is evenly distributed.

The paint seemed a little thin to me after I'd mixed the parts together. I assume this is normal. Don't be alarmed if yours seems thin as well.

Step 11: Paint (Finally!)

I applied three coats to the bathtub and tile using foam rollers. Almost everything could be done with the foam rollers, with the exception of a couple parts around the faucets, which I used foam brushes for.

Once the first coat was applied, I waited one hour before applying the second coat. Note that that was one hour, and only one hour. According to the Amazon reviews, waiting longer actually decreases adhesion between the coats. People who waited too long found that the paint peeled up instead of sticking.

Moral of the story: apply your second coat an hour after your first coat.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

As you can see above, the first coat was clearly blotchy. The second coat was better, but I really needed three coats to completely cover the beige tile. I also waited an hour between the second and third coats.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY
Step 12: Finishing Touches

After the paint is fully dry (I waited three days,) reinstall the drain and caulk the edges. I show how I replaced the drain in the video linked above, but if you'd like to watch an actual professional, this video is short and straightforward, and is what I watched before I replaced the drain.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

I will mention that once I'd installed the drain, the overflow pipe no longer matched the hole in my bathtub. I freaked out for a few minutes, then loosened my drain. Loosening the drain a turn or two caused the overflow pipe to match up perfectly.

Caulk the bathtub with tub and tile caulk. My general technique is to apply the caulk with a caulk gun, then smooth out with my finger and a damp paper towel. While tub and tile caulk isn't water soluble like many caulks are, before it dries it still wipes off the tub/tile surface pretty easily.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

After the caulk dries, the bathtub is ready for use! Check your caulk to see how long you need to wait before exposing to water - mine was 24 hours.

Cost Considerations

This was a pretty cheap project compared to replacing a bathtub. That said, there are a bunch of small things that need to be purchased to paint your bathtub, and those costs add up. I spent about $50 on two kits of paint, and another $40 on other supplies.

Most items I purchased from Amazon all at the same time to keep things simple, since there were so many small supplies that needed to be purchased. Of course, I did miss a couple items, which I ended up purchasing in town at my local hardware store.

If you're overwhelmed by the supply list for this project, be sure to grab the Materials Checklist. It's free, and will keep you organized as you shop for supplies.

Other FAQs

I've read some people experience bubbling. Did you?

Short answer: yes.

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

Long answer: the bubbling was only in two very small spots that were difficult to prep correctly. The decorative tile in the center of the shower was bumpy and therefore more difficult to sand properly. That is where I had a little bit of bubbling. It's barely noticeable, and now that it's dry it seems solid. I don't expect it will cause any issues.

How long did this take?

I spent one full day prepping the bathtub for painting, then painted the tub the next morning. Three days later, I probably spent an hour or so reinstalling the drain and caulking the edges. You could probably consider it a weekend project.

How long until I can use my bathtub/shower again?

Rustoleum says to wait three days before exposing the bathtub/shower to water. I waited a week just to be safe.

I don't need a full can of paint. Can I only mix part of the can?

Yes. Mix in a 4:1 ratio of paint (Part B) to epoxy (Part A). As an example, one cup of paint mixed with a 1/4 cup of epoxy would be the correct ratio.

Is the product self-leveling, and does it dry texture-free?

So, the product is described as self-leveling, and it is for the most part. I can't see individual strokes from my roller, and flaws I noticed while painting disappeared during the drying process. That said, there is texture from the roller.

I don't think it looks bad, and honestly, I wouldn't have even noticed it if I wasn't looking for it. It's like if you paint a wall with a roller, there's going to be a little texture. It's inevitable.

Final Thoughts

This is a budget-friendly way to update an ugly bathtub. I doubt it'll last forever, but it's a great bargain while you save up for your future perfect bathroom remodel. 

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

Painting my bathtub was the first step in my bathroom refresh project - more projects are coming soon! Be sure to subscribe to my newsletter so that you can see the final transformation when it's finished! And in the meantime, if you found this helpful be sure to save this post to Pinterest so you can find it again later!

Learn how to refinish a bathtub with this detailed tutorial! Includes everything you need to successfully paint your bathtub and tile, including how to replace the drain, repair chips, and prep for painting! #Homeimprovement #DIY

How to Build a Pegboard Wall

Learn how to build a pegboard wall - including adding a frame and extending electrical outlets! Full photo and video tutorial shows you exactly what to do!

Confession time: two years ago, I attempted to close up a doorway between my laundry room and kitchen. I did a terrible job. DIY isn't always the way to go. That project was one of those times I probably should have hired out.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

So for the past two years, I've stared at this giant bump in the wall every time I went to do laundry. I pretended it wasn't there. But now it's time to sell the house, and this just isn't going to fly anymore.

Solution: cover the wall with pegboard. Laundry room pegboard walls are a thing, right? 

DIY Pegboard Wall Overview

The general process for building a pegboard wall goes like this: 

  1. Hang furring strips on the wall to bump the pegboard out from the wall and allow room for pegs behind pegboard. Make sure the furring strips are screwed into studs.
  2. Hang pegboard on furring strips. 
  3. Extend any light switches or electrical outlets.
  4. Make and install frame.
  5. Caulk all seams and edges, and paint if desired.

It is very helpful to have a friend, particularly when hanging the pegboard, but it's not impossible to do by yourself - I managed!

Before I started, I did a significant amount of planning so that I knew exactly how I wanted Home Depot to cut my pegboard pieces. I planned for my pegboard wall to be 72" wide and 90" tall, aka, 6 feet wide and 7 1/2 feet tall. I took into account:

  1. The size of the space.
  2. Any light switches or electrical outlets. I chose to extend the pegboard past them, and bump the switches out to rest on top of the pegboard, but you may make a different choice.
  3. Transporting the pegboard. I have a trailer that is almost able to fit 4'x8' sheets of plywood - the length is fine, but the internal width of my trailer is only 46" across. I didn't want to mess with transporting the pegboard at an angle, so I had Home Depot trim each piece down to 45" wide, hence the 90" height.

The materials listed below are what I used for my 72" x 90" pegboard.

Note: This post contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

Materials Required

  • Pegboard - I used 3/16" white pegboard purchased from Home Depot. Both Home Depot and Lowes can cut your pegboard for you (Midwestern chain Menards cannot,) and I recommend having them do so, if for no other reason than ease of transport. 
  • (15) 1"x 2" Furring Strips - Seven of these will support the pegboard on the wall, while the other eight will form the frame.
  • Electrical Extenders - You have two options here, a gang box extender, or electrical spacers that bump out the outlet. I recommend the gang box extender - it's easier to use, and is sturdier for applications like this that require a pretty large bump out. That said, I used the spacers since the the gang box extender didn't fit in my old-house electrical boxes.
  • Long Level
  • Construction Adhesive
  • Wood Screws and Brad Nails
  • Caulk
  • Paint

How to Build a Pegboard Wall

Step 1: Determine and Mark Furring Strip Locations

I actually purchased 6  furring strips that I planned to mount horizontally on the wall to support the pegboard, but I recommend purchasing 7. Then you can put three on the top half of the pegboard, three on the bottom half of the pegboard, and one right in the middle where the first pegboard ends and second pegboard starts. 

The fact that I had six furring strips means that I had three on the bottom, one in the middle, and two on the top. The furring strips on the top are therefore more widely spaced, and the pegboard is a little wobbly between them. Use seven furring strips, friends.

Regardless, determine where your furring strips will go, and mark those locations with a pencil. 

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement
Step 2: Determine and Mark Stud Locations

The furring strips need to be secured into wall studs in order to create a stable mount for your pegboard. In my case, this was super easy, since I hadn't painted the doorway I could see the nails in the wall and knew exactly where three studs were.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

If you need to actually find studs through drywall, I highly recommend this stud finder. It's simple, cheap, and accurately finds nails in your drywall (aka, stud locations.) While it doesn't work on plaster walls, it was a life saver back when I lived in a house with drywall.

Step 3: Mount Furring Strips

Put a line of construction adhesive on the back of a furring strip, then place the furring strip on the wall in the place you've marked.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Since my wall was so uneven, there were gaps in spots between my furring strip and the wall. I cut little pieces of wood to go in these spots to make everything level.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Given you're working with a normal wall, you probably won't need to do this. If your wall is even, any gaps you see are probably caused by warpage in your furring strip. In that case, I wouldn't worry about adding these shim pieces - when you screw the furring strip to the wall, it'll un-warp and align itself.

Using a level similar in length to your furring strip, check that your furring strip is level. Double check this. Triple check this. I didn't (which I'll discuss a bit later) and had some issues because of it later.

Finally, screw your furring strip to the wall in the locations where you've identified studs. Since the screws need to go through A) a furring strip, B) drywall/plaster, and C) into the stud, you'll need pretty long screws here - I think I used 2 1/2" screws. 

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement
Step 4: Mount Pegboard 

Note: I used a Dremel to cut my outlet holes after I'd mounted the pegboard. However, if you don't have a Dremel and would prefer to use a jigsaw, cut these holes prior to mounting the pegboard.

I used 1" screws to secure the pegboard to the furring strips. I thought about using construction adhesive as well, but considering I was struggling to lift and secure the pegboard already (I was working alone,) I decided not to add something messy into the mix. 

I started with the top pegboard, and put screws along the top furring strip every 12 holes. Then I added screws on either end of the pegboard at each furring strip.

Finally, I added brad nails in the middle of the pegboard to secure the center to the furring strips and make it less wobbly. 

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

I mentioned I did this alone. It was a bit of a struggle in the beginning, but then I had a brilliant idea. I took a bit of scrap wood, and mounted it to the center of the bottom furring strip right where I wanted the pegboard to end.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Then I could rest the pegboard on this piece while I made sure things were level and added the first few screws. Once I was done, I just pulled the piece out with pliers, and it was like it was never there.

Step 5: Cut Holes for Outlets and Switches

The cool thing about pegboard is that it has holes in it, which means if you shine a flashlight into those holes, you can see exactly where the outlets and light switches are. Using this idea, I traced an outline on my pegboard where my switches and outlets were.

Then I used a cutting attachment on my Dremel tool to cut the holes. 

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

This was way easier than the measuring and guess and check methods I've used in the past. Plus, I didn't have to find a place to lay the giant pegboard in order to cut it with a jigsaw!

Then I pulled out the switch, and added extenders between the wall and the switch. I re-screwed the screws into the wall, reattached the cover plate, and was good to go!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement
Step 6: Make Frame Pieces

I used two furring strips for each side of the frame - one which covers the gap between the wall and the pegboard, and another that overlaps the pegboard. I started by attaching these together with wood glue and brad nails.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Then I caulked the seam between them, and added wood filler to any knots holes or dents. Once the wood filler was dry, I sanded down the piece with my orbital sander.

Finally, I put two coats of white paint on each frame piece.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement
Step 7: Mount Frame Pieces

I attached these to the pegboard using construction adhesive and brad nails, making sure the brad nails were placed such that they went through the furring strips.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement
Step 8: Finishing Touches

Finally, I caulked the seam between the two pegboard pieces, as well as any gaps between the frame and the pegboard. Then my pegboard wall was done!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Tips and Tricks

There are a couple of things I'd do differently next time, and I thought I'd let you know exactly what those were!

1. Cut the Wall Furring Strips a Little Short

I cut my furring strips for the wall exactly the length of the pegboard. This meant if I didn't get all the furring strips perfectly vertically aligned, the furring strips would stick out one one side. Guess what? I didn't get the furring strips perfectly aligned.

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

If the furring strips were just a little shorter, this wouldn't have been an issue. I covered it up with the frame, so it's not visible in my final product, but things would have been better if that wasn't an issue.

2. Double Check the Furring Strips are Level

I thought I'd checked that the furring strips were level. Apparently sometime between my last level check and when those furring strips got attached to the wall, some of them became un-level. That created this:

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

Once again I covered it up with the frame. If I was doing this again, I'd double check my furring strip was still level after I drove in the screws.

3. Use an Odd Number of Furring Strips

While I told you in the instructions to use seven furring strips, I actually used six. I wrote this up to be seven, because I wish I'd used seven. In using seven furring strips, I could have had three furring strips supporting each piece of pegboard, and one strip in the middle to secure the seam between the two pieces.

Cost Considerations

This is a really budget-friendly way to add storage to a small space. Given that you're a DIY-er who has an assortment of tools on hand, it can be done for under $60. Here's my cost cost breakdown:

Item

Cost

Furring Strips

$17.70

Pegboard

$37.04

Gang Box Extender*

$3.57

Total Cost:

$58.31

*I didn't actually use the gang box extender since it didn't fit - but since I already had the spacers, I left it in there anyway so you had a good idea of the total cost.

Other FAQs

Will this damage my wall?

The method as described above will put holes in your wall wherever there are screws, as well as stick construction adhesive to your wall at each of the furring strips. It is intended to be permenant.

If you think you might want to remove the pegboard at some point, don't use construction adhesive between the furring strips and the wall. The screws alone are enough to hold the furring strips and pegboard in place. 

The construction adhesive is honestly overkill, but I used it since it caused the furring strip to stick to the wall while I was mounting it, which made things easier for me since nobody was holding the furring strips in place. This is a non-issue if you have a friend to help you hold them up.

How much weight will this pegboard hold? 

Great question! Unfortunately I don't have an exact number for you - I couldn't find a reliable source on the weight capacity of 3/16" pegboard. That said, if you're planning to hang really heavy things and are worried, there are a couple things you can do to make sure your pegboard holds:

  • Purchase Thicker Pegboard - Hardboard pegboard, which is what you'll find at most Home Improvement stores, generally comes in 3 sizes, the thinnest, 1/8"; medium thickness, 3/16"; and the thickest size, 1/4." The thicker the pegboard, the more weight it can hold. Additionally, metal pegboard exists and has higher weight capacities.
  • Add Rail Strips - This isn't something I've ever personally done, so I'm going to refrain from telling you too much, but I know metal rail strips can be purchased and installed at the top of pegboards for extra heavy items.
Does it matter if I mount my furring strips vertically or horizontally?

The short answer is no, not really, but my personal preference is for horizontally. The reason? When you mount horizontally, each screw goes into a different stud. If one screw misses a stud, it's no big deal; the other screws hit studs, so it's fine.

But if you mount vertically, all the screws on a single furring strip go into the same stud. If your screw misses a stud, all the screws probably missed studs. Theoretically, you'd notice and move your furring strip one way or another, but either way it's a nuisance, and just easier to mount horizontally in the first place.

What pegboard accessories did you use?

I grabbed this package at Harbor Freight. The advertised "32-piece" description is a little misleading; 12 of the pieces are screws and spacers for mounting the pegboard. Regardless, I still thought it was a good value, and am more than happy with the assortment and variety included in the pack.

Final Photographs

I'm so happy with how the DIY Pegboard Wall turned out - much better than the bump that was there before!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

I also love that some things that needed permanent homes found them on this pegboard! My laundry baskets tended to just get left wherever they were last used... no more, now that they have a real home!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

And I had struggled to find a home near an outlet for my handheld vacuum. This is the perfect place!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

I absolutely love my new pegboard wall! If you like it too, or plan on building your own, be sure to save this post to Pinterest so that you can find it again later! And if you're looking for more creative wall ideas, be sure to check out my DIY Burlap Walls - I figured they'd look good, but I was absolutely shocked by how great they turned out!

This thorough tutorial shows you exactly how to build a DIY Pegboard Wall in your laundry room, craft room, or garage! This framed pegboard project is done in a weekend and looks fantastic! #organization #homeimprovement

The Fast Way to Replace a Dining Chair Cushion

Learn to replace a dining chair cushion the quick, easy, and cheap way with this photo and video tutorial!

My father and aunts were kind enough to donate my late grandparents' dining set to my new home. The table is gorgeous, but I have some questions about these chairs.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

Mainly, what on earth happened to the seat?? I imagine this chair came with a real cushion, but at some point in the past seventy-five years, my grandfather replaced it with a piece of 1/2" plywood covered in fabric. 

Since my grandfather was a pretty smart guy, and much better at DIY than I am, I'm going to assume he had a good reason for the switch. But given these are rather painful to sit on after about twenty minutes, I'm going to update them.

Now, a quick disclaimer before I start: like my couch reupholster, this is a cheater method. I needed a cushion on these chairs quickly and cheaply. This is not at all the proper way to replace a dining chair cushion, but it gets the job done.

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

The Plan

I found these cheapo metal framed chairs ("hotel conference-style" is what I've deemed them in my head) at my local Habitat Restore for $1.50 each. 

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

The seat is not a perfect match, but very similar in size to my dining chairs. The general plan is to take the seat of these cheapo chairs, and transfer it onto my dining chairs. Since it's not the perfect size, I'll add some batting and pillow fluff in the corners to even everything out.

Materials
  • Dining Chairs to be updated
  • Thrifted Chair Seats
  • Batting
  • Spray Adhesive
  • Fabric - I used drop cloth scraps I had from other projects
  • Staples/Staple Gun - This was the first time I tried my new electric staple gun, and oh my goodness, it was the best thing ever. So much better than struggling to operate the mechanical gun.
  • Optional: Polyfil - I have a collection of pillow fluff that I've removed from thrifted pillows that I keep in a vacuum sealed bag. I used some in this project, but you could just as easily use extra batting if you don't have any polyfil around.
Step 1: Remove the Chair Seats

Both chair seats were held in by screws on the bottom of chairs. I flipped the chairs open, and using a drill driver, removed the screws. The seats popped right off.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY
Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY
Step 2: Secure the Cushioned Seat to the Plywood Seat

I said above that this was the cheater method. I wasn't lying. If I wanted to do a good job, I would have A) cut a new, thicker base, and B) removed the cushion from the other seat, and secured it to my new base.

But that was a ton of work that I would have had to do four times, and I just wasn't that into this. So, I just glued the cushioned seat, as is, to the plywood piece using the spray adhesive.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

Then I flipped the seat over and added screws to secure the plywood to the cushion. I used the screws that once held the cushioned seat to the metal frame, since I wasn't doing anything else with them.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY
Step 3: Smooth Edges with Batting

Since my cushion wasn't a perfect fit, I grabbed some pillow fluff and batting to pad the edges.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

My cushion was too small, but if yours is too large, you could remove the cushion from its base, and cut it down to size.

To secure the batting, I wrapped it around the cushion and stapled it in place with my staple gun. The electric staple gun makes a huge difference, friends!

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY
Step 4: Cover with New Fabric

I'm a big fan of drop cloths for pretty much everything except curtains. As a result, I have a ton of drop cloth scraps hanging out in my fabric scraps bin. Since these chair seats weren't very big, they were the perfect use for some of my larger scraps!

I wrapped the drop cloth around the chair seat and stapled it into place with my staple gun.

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

Don't overthink the corners. As long as they look neat, they'll be fine.

Step 5: Attach Chair Seat to Chair

Using the four screws that were originally securing the chair seat, re-secure the chair seat to the chair. Enjoy your new cushion!

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

I'm so pleased with how it turned out - the chairs are way more comfortable to sit on now!

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

I'm about to move, so I didn't want to make any major changes (like refinishing the wood) until I know what my new dining room will look like. But for now, this is the perfect compromise; comfy without much work!

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

If you found this post helpful, be sure to save it to Pinterst so you can find it again later! And if you replace a dining chair cushion on your own chairs, let me know how it goes in the comments below!

Replace a dining chair cushion the easy way with this complete tutorial! DIY, budget-friendly method doesn't require any tools to replace a chair seat, and each chair can be done in under 30 minutes. #upholstery #DIY

DIY Fabric Scraps Storage Bin

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage Bin is easy to make and a handy way to corral fabric scraps. A drop cloth, tomato cage, and some 1/2" plywood are all it takes to make this easy project!

I'm in the process of cleaning my craft room, and man, do I have a lot of fabric scraps. Every time I turn around, I find a small bit of fabric that's not large enough to do a full project with, but could still be useful. Since I needed an easy place to put these, I threw together a quick DIY fabric scraps storage bin to keep all of them in one nice, neat place.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

Materials

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
  • Tomato Cage - I used a 14" square cage that I found for less than $10 at Menards, but any cage that's the same dimensions on the top and bottom will do. If you use a cylindrical cage, there are some minor changes to the process (cut your plywood in a circle instead of a square, etc) but nothing too complicated. 
  • Drop Cloth - Be sure to wash your dropcloth before sewing! I buy my drop cloths from Harbor Freight, but I've heard good things about these ones from Amazon if there's not a Harbor Freight near you.
  • 1/2" or 3/4" Plywood - I used a scrap piece I had around. 
  • Staple Gun and Staples - You'll want longer staples for this project (I used 1/2") because the stakes are what you'll be stapling in place, and these are bulky.
  • Spray Paint (Optional) - After I built the DIY Fabric Scraps Storage Bin, I decided it would look better black than green, so I took some black spray paint and painted it. This is clearly optional.

Part 1: Make Bin

Step 1: Assemble Tomato Cage

My tomato cage came flat, and required I unfold it and connect the loose sides. This was not difficult.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 2: Cut and Place Plywood Base

Since my tomato cage was 14" square, I cut my 1/2" piece of plywood to be a square with 14" sides. Then I placed it at the bottom of the cage, about five inches from the end of the stakes.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 3: Fold and Secure Cage Stakes

This was the most difficult part of the project. I bent the stakes around the plywood piece and stapled them in place with the staple gun.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

The main problem was that the stakes weren't bent enough, and kept pulling out the staples. I think this would have been way easier and more exact if I had marked where each stake should be bent, and then removed the plywood and bent the stakes. I didn't think of this until afterward though, so I haven't tried it. If you give it a shot, let me know how it goes.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

Toward the end, I flipped the cage upside down so I could staple from the top down.

Step 4: Add Feet

I didn't want the staples scratching my floors, plus my cage was a tad lopsided, so I added feet to the bottom with wood glue and brad nails to level everything out.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 5: Trim Cage

When I took the bin upstairs and put it in place, I decided it was a little taller than I'd like. So I took it back downstairs and cut it down using a jigsaw.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

If you're scared of cutting metal, know that there is really no reason to be. It goes slower than cutting wood, but there weren't any sparks or anything. Alternatively, you could buy a shorter cage. Mine was 47" tall, but I think they sell 36" tall tomato cages as well.

Part 2: Sew Liner

Step 1: Cut Fabric Sides

A fancy sewing person might opt to cut each side separately and sew them together to make a more rectangular shape. I am not that person. My sewing skills are mediocre at best, and I opt for the quick method rather than the right method 90% of the time.

The quick method in this project is to cut two pieces of fabric: one that is the four sides, one that is the base. 

Since each side is 14", and I wanted to leave a little extra fabric for seam allowances, I theoretically cut a piece that was 40" tall x 58" wide (14 x 4 + 2 inches for seam allowance.)

I say theoretically, because what I actually did was fold the fabric three times (for four sides,) making the first and last fold 15" long, and the inside pieces 14" long. Clearly, I didn't feel like doing math that day.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 2: Pin and Sew Sides

I pinned the first side to the last side, right sides together, then sewed it in place.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 3: Add Base

Since the cage is 14" square, I added a bit of fabric for seam allowance, and cut the base to be 15" square. Then I pinned it to sides, and sewed it in place.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom
Step 4: Sew Hem

Finally, I folded the loose edges on the top of the liner, then pinned and sewed them in place.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

Once the liner was done, I placed it in bin and folded up the edges a little for a bit of extra personality!

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

I also spray painted the bin black, since I wasn't a big fan of the green.

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

I was a little worried mid-way through that the DIY fabric scrap storage bin was lopsided and strange, but after adding the liner and painting the bin, it looks great!

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

It's super nice to have a place to put my fabric scraps, and this was an quick and easy project that was kind to the budget! If you like it too, be sure to save this post to pinterest! And if you love space-saving organization projects, check out my Under the Bed Storage Drawers!

This DIY Fabric Scraps Storage bin is the best way to corral extra fabric from sewing projects! A quick afternoon project, this scrap bin - made from a drop cloth and tomato cage - is perfect for your craft room! #Storage #CraftRoom

DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

I love mirrors. But not in a "vain and want to stare at myself way," more a "mirrors make rooms bright and pretty" way. So when I had blank wall space in my bedroom, I knew a mirror was the perfect thing to add. And when I saw these Anthropologie jewelry organizers, an idea was born.

For whatever reason, I feel the Anthropologie jewelry organizers are dying for a mirror in between them. I'm also somewhat outraged that they're tiny 12" long things sold as two separate pieces, but since I decided to make my own, I suppose I'll get over it.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Mounting Logistics

Note: I'm putting this section first, even though it's the last thing done because I want to make sure you understand how this works before starting the project.

The DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer actually gets mounted in two separate pieces: the bottom shelf will be secured first. Then the mirror will be slid into place, and the second piece (the top piece) will be secured on top of it.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

There will be a groove in each wood piece for the mirror to rest on. I accomplished this by adding a 1/4" scrap plywood piece to the back of each main wood piece. However, if you have a table saw, you could saw a groove in the back of the wood as well. The plywood option was easier for me, but either method works.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Finally, the top piece is secured over the mirror. Note that no screws go through the mirror, they're all placed either above or below the mirror.

DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer

Materials
This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking
  • Brass Cup Hooks
  • 2" Thick Wood Pieces - 2x4s and 2x6s could work for this, although I cut scrap pieces I had. 
  • 24" x 30" MirrorThe linked mirror comes with plastic mirror clips for hanging. I used these for extra security, but they were probably unnecessary.
  • 1/4" Dowel Rod
  • Gold Spray Paint
  • 2 Screw Eyes - Make sure these are large enough to fit the 1/4" dowel rod through.
  • Pocket Hole Jig and 2 1/2" Pocket Hole Screws
  • 1/4" Plywood Scraps
  • Countersink Drill Bit
  • Optional: Wood Stain and Finish

Part 1: The Bottom Shelf

Step 1: Cut and Prep Wood Pieces

All my pieces were cut down from an old 2" x 10" that I think was once a part of a bedframe. This method requires a table saw, but if you don't have a table saw, using 2x4s and 2x6s instead would have a very similar look.

The two pieces making up the bottom portion of the mirror were cut to be 30" long, and 3.5" and 5.5" inches wide.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

The wider piece ultimately makes up the shelf, while the smaller piece will go underneath the shelf and attach to the wall.

The piece at the top of the mirror is also 30" long, and is cut to be 4.75" inches wide.

At this point, I did a ton of sanding, since this was "reclaimed" (aka, I purchased it used from the Habitat Restore) wood. Go check out my system for cleaning up wood if yours needs a little work as well.

Step 2: Spray Paint Dowel Rod and Screw Eyes

Cut the dowel rod to be 30" long, then spray paint the rod and the screw eyes gold. I purposefully ordered brass cup hooks, but if your cup hooks are another color, spray paint those as well.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

You'll need to flip everything over and get the backs at some point, which I did while working on the rest of the project.

Step 3: Attach Bottom Pieces Together

Add four evenly spaced pocket holes to the back of the 3.5" wide piece. Then connect the 3.5" piece to the bottom of the 5.5" piece using 2 1/2" pocket hole screws.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

If you have a clear opinion on which sides of your wood face up/out, make sure you're thinking about that here.

Step 4: Stain the Bottom Piece

I did a ton of testing with different stains before I started to make sure I got a color that I liked. I always recommend this, since stain looks different on each piece of wood. I did the tests on the back of my shelf.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Note: You might notice there are mirror clips in the above photo. These weren't necessary, and actually made things more difficult when I hung the project, so ignore them.

Once I'd decided on a stain, I applied wood conditioner and stained the piece.

Step 5: Add "Groove"

If you're using a table saw to add a groove to your piece (as discussed in the "Mounting Logistics" section,) do that now. Instead of that option, I decided to add a 1/4" piece of plywood to the back of my piece. This has the same effect as the groove, bumping out the shelf so that the mirror has a spot to rest.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

I secured the plywood piece to my shelf using wood glue and brad nails. When the shelf is ultimately hung on the wall, the mounting screws will go through the plywood, providing a sturdy connection.

Step 6: Add Mounting Holes

I've seen some organizers at Target that mount to the wall with obvious screws that have been countersunk into the wood so that they look nice. I've decided if this look is good enough for Target, it's good enough for me. Thus, I added three countersink holes to the front of my shelf to ultimately mount the piece to the wall.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

IMPORTANT: I have plaster walls. Therefore, I didn't have to worry about getting into a stud - as long as I hit lath (horizontal pieces of wood behind the plaster) when securing my shelf, I'd be fine. However, if your walls are made of drywall, you'll need to make sure your screws get into studs. Find your studs on the wall using a stud finder before drilling the countersink holes, then make sure your countersink holes are spaced appropriately. You'll probably only want two screws/holes instead of the three I used.

Step 7: Add Accessories

I spaced the cup hooks two inches apart on the bottom of the mounting piece, marking the places with a pencil and drilling pilot holes in each spot before adding the cup hooks.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking
This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

I mounted the screw eyes on the bottom side of the shelf piece a couple inches from each end, then slid the dowel rod through the screw eyes.

Part 2: The Top Piece

Step 1: Cut, Sand and Stain

My top piece actually measures 4.75" wide, which is not a size you can purchase at Home Depot. That's okay. 2x6 pieces measures 5.5" wide, which I think will look good too.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

I sanded my piece considerably the same way I did with the bottom shelf, then stained it.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking
Step 2: Add "Groove" Piece

Just as I did in Part 1, I added a 1/4" piece to the back of wood to create a "groove" for the mirror to rest in. This piece was smaller than my Part 1 piece, because I wanted more overlap between the mirror and the wood. This was purely for aesthetics.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Once again, this piece was secured with wood glue and brad nails. 

Step 3: Add Countersink Holes

I added a countersink hole on either end of the piece, making sure my hole was placed such that it went through the 1/4" plywood. If your walls are drywall, make sure you've taken the location of your studs into account before drilling these holes.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

I didn't have any accessory parts on my top piece (although you could totally add some if you wanted!) so once my countersink holes were in place, I was ready to mount!

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

I love how it turned out! The shelf is the perfect place for my makeup and brushes, and the hooks and dowel rood are perfect for corralling all of my jewelry!

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

My dad also thinks it'll help me sell the house, which is cool too.

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Regardless, it's super handy to have around, and wasn't that hard to make! If you think you might make a DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer too, be sure to save this post to Pinterest so you can find it again later! And if you love organizers, check out my other organizer builds here!

This DIY Mirrored Jewelry Organizer is easy to make and a super practical addition to any girl's bedroom! An easy afternoon scrap wood project! #DIY #Woodworking

Easy DIY Slipcovers

Cool fact about my BFF: She's a chef. Pretty much anytime there's a gathering at her house, she goes all out with the food. I always offer to help, but if there's nothing for me to do, I'll sit in the kitchen and keep her company while she works. But recently, my favorite spot disappeared - the counter-height barstools in the kitchen fell apart and were regulated to furniture heaven. This was unacceptable to me.

Now, I'm not really sure if my friend wanted new barstools. She and her husband seemed perfectly okay barstool-less. But they didn't protest when I offered to add barstools to my project calendar, and I wanted my favorite spot back, so here we are.

Lucky for me, I found a pair of barstools at my local Habitat Restore for $10 each. Honestly, they're a little too-nice; I really struggled in the beginning with what to do with them. The leather was high quality, the finish was a little worn, but not terrible... basically, I was truly afraid I'd make them worse.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

So I decided to make slipcovers for them instead of doing anything major. My friend has a toddler and another daughter on the way; washable slipcovers seemed to be the way to go. And if they move or prefer the original style of the chair sometime, they can just take the slipcover off. Win-win.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

DIY Barstool Slipcovers

Materials
  • 9' x 12' Dropcloth - I washed (but didn't bleach) this before I started working. Each dropcloth will make slipcovers for three chairs. Look for 100% cotton dropcloths with no seam in the middle. I purchased mine at Harbor Freight, but they have at least three different dropcloth manufacturers, and one of them does put a seam in the middle. If you can find Item Number 38109, that version is 100% cotton and doesn't have a seam.
  • General Sewing Supplies (Thread, pins, scissors, machine, etc.) - I have this sewing machine, and it is easiest thing to use... which is good, because I am not that good with sewing machines. If you're looking for a good beginner machine, check it out.
Step 1: Cut Out Fabric

Start by cutting a 10" strip of fabric off the edge of the long side. Meaning: You should have a 12' long strip that's hemmed on three sides.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Do this on the other end of the fabric as well, so that you have two 10" wide, 12' long strips. We'll use these later to make the decorative knots.

Then fold the fabric into thirds and cut. I didn't measure here - each third is more than enough to cover one chair.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Finally, lay your fabric (now 1/3 of the total dropcloth) out on the chair. If your fabric has a "right side," that should be facing the chair. Make sure everything is fully covered with extra fabric to spare, then cut the fabric between the back and the seat of the chair.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers
Step 2: Make Back of Slipcover

Pull the fabric taut at the sides of the back of the chair, and pin in place, right sides together. In fact, every stitch you make in the project is right sides together, so I'm going to stop saying it.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Once both sides of the chair have been pinned, sew. I tested the fit of after the first side was sewn, but never had to do any adjusting. Also, as you can see in the photo above, I had a ton of extra fabric; I trimmed it before I sewed.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers
Step 3: Attach Seat to Back

Pin the seat fabric to the base of the back fabric.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Because the sides of the seat need to go a couple inches further back to reach the back of the chair, you'll have some extra fabric at the crease area between the back and the seat of the chair. That's okay, just trim it off after everything is pinned. Here's a closeup of the side area so you can see exactly how everything comes together:

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Sew in place. This was the hardest part for me, but I just did my best (and I am NOT an expert seamstress) and it all worked out.

Step 4: Finish Seat

Make the corners of the front of the chair by pinning the excess fabric together. Then cut off the extra fabric and sew along the pin line. 

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Once the corners are done, fold up the bottom of the four sides of the slipcover, and hem.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

The bottom of the slipcover isn't hemmed in the above photo, but you get the idea. At this point, the main part of the slipcover is done. I trimmed any excess fabric off so that there was only a 1/2" or so extra at all of the seams, then turned the slipcover so that it was right side out.

Step 5: Make the Knots

Take the strips of fabric you cut at the beginning of the project, and knot them around the chair to determine how long your knot fabric should be. I didn't measure mine (theme of this project, apparently,) but each knot used about half the length of one of the strips.

I also cut down the width of the strip to about 6.5 inches at this point as well. I originally cut 10 inches off of the main fabric just to be safe, but I liked the look of the 6.5" strip. Go with what looks best to you based on your chair.

Finally, cut your strip to the correct length, then pin and hem any loose sides.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Knot the strip around your chair, and enjoy your new slipcovers!

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

So, as I mentioned above, these are actually barstools, but they were easier to photograph in the dining room, so just ignore the fact that they're way too tall for this table.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

I love the simplicity of the knot on the back of the chair. Which is good, since the back is what's seen, given that the front of the chair is mostly covered by the counter anyway.. That said, the front looks nice too.

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

Overall, I am so pleased with how they turned out! And if you were wondering, I got to test out the new barstools on New Years Eve, and yes, they're the perfect thing for chatting with my BFF while she hustles around the kitchen. If you like these simple DIY slipcovers, be sure to save them to Pinterest so you can find them again later! And if you make them yourself, let me know how it goes in the comments below!

Sew slipcovers for your dining chairs and barstools with this easy sewing tutorial. A great beginner project, these DIY slipcovers are both practical and a great way to improve your sewing skills! #sewing #slipcovers

DIY Flower Artwork

Note: This post contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

A few weeks back, I was browsing Anthropologie and came across this "Cascading Flowers Wall Art." It was pretty, but not $1000 pretty, so I moved right along. But then I did a double take and realized that the $1000 price tag was for only one of the pieces in the two piece set. Were these flowers made of pure gold or something? In my mind, they had to be to justify that price.

Partially because I needed art, and partially out of spite of Anthropologie's ridiculous pricing system, I decided to make my own version. I can make a white box. I can make gold flowers. And guess what, Anthropologie? It won't cost me anywhere near $2000.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

Anthropologie-Inspired DIY Flower Artwork

Materials

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject
  • 1/4" Plywood - I purchased a whole sheet and had it cut down at Home Depot since the scrap wood is useful to me, but you can purchase smaller panels as well.
  • (3) 1" x 2" Furring Strips
  • Polymer Clay- I made about 100 flowers (way more than I needed) out of 1.75 lbs of clay.
  • Gold Spray Paint
  • Surebonder 9001 High Strength Adhesive
  • Caulk
  • White Latex Paint
  • Wood Glue
  • 3/4" Screws

Part 1: Make Flowers

Step 1: Make Clay Marbles

I started by rolling out four clay balls. These will ultimately form the petals of the flower, and if you wanted to make more intricate flowers, you could totally add more petals and layers to this design. That said, I wanted to make sure I had plenty of flowers, and didn't want to spend my whole life making them, so I only did four petals per flower.

The clay balls were each slightly smaller than a marble. I did my best to make the pieces even-sized.

Step 2: Press Clay Into Petals

I then used my thumb to press each piece into a petal shape. I'm sure any other finger would work just as well, but fingernails get in way here, and my thumbnail had just recently broke, so...

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

I'm working on parchment paper, so the clay doesn't stick to my workspace.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject
Step 3: Arrange Petals and Add Center

Once I had all four petals, I arranged them neatly. I did my best to stick the ugliest petal on the bottom each time. Then I rolled a small, pea-sized piece of clay, and flattened it in the center of the flower.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject
Step 4: Repeat Steps 1-3 and Bake Flowers

I listened to podcasts, videochatted with a friend, and watched numerous youtube videos while I worked. It's a really brainless task, so line up some shows to watch while you work!

Once you have enough flowers to justify turning on the oven, bake the flowers for 20 minutes at 265 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 5: Paint Flowers

I laid the flowers out in my basement, and spray painted both sides of them with gold spray paint. Theoretically, I would have done this outside where there was better ventilation, but it's winter here, so that's out. I let the flowers sit at least 24 hours before attaching them to the frame in order to make sure the paint was cured.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

Part 2: Make Frame

Step 1: Cut Plywood and Frame to Desired Size

I initially intended to put these over my queen sized bed, so I made them 22" wide by 32" tall. The plywood pieces were each cut to these dimensions on my table saw - if you don't have a table saw, Home Depot and Lowes (but not Menards... step it up, Menards) can both cut the plywood for you.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

I cut the frame pieces to span the perimeter of the plywood. These cuts were done on my miter saw, but Home Depot and Lowes can cut these as well.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject
Step 2: Secure Frame to Plywood

After sanding the furring strips considerably (they were rather rough,) I glued the the frame pieces to the plywood with wood glue. I let them dry for 20 minutes, then flipped the pieces over and added screws from the back for long-term stability.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

By doing it this way, I could make sure the frame pieces were aligned properly from the front when I glued them in place. Then when I added the screws after the glue was dry, I knew everything was in the right spot.

Step 3: Caulk Gaps

You might be inclined to skip this step, but don't! Caulk is really easy to work with, and it makes everything look much more professional. I added caulk at all the joints, and between the frame and the plywood pieces. It makes everything look so much better!

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

The secret to working with caulk is to use all-purpose, water-soluble caulk. Dip your finger in water, then smooth it in place. 

Step 4: Paint Frame

I used some old white paint I had sitting around that was custom matched to my kitchen cabinets, so if you're wondering what I color I used, I unfortunately won't be able to help you.

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject
Step 5: Glue Flowers to Frame

I laid all the flowers out on the frame, then used Surebonder 9001 to glue them in place. 

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

Then the art was done!

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

I love how it turned out, although funny story, I don't actually love them in the place I originally intended to put them. They're a little too modern for my bedroom, I think, so I may end up switching them out with some art in the living room. We'll see!

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

Regardless, I consider this DIY Flower Artwork a win! If you think so too, go ahead and save this post to Pinterest so you can find it again later! And if you're looking for more art for your home, check out my Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror, which is a really simple project that adds a ton of style to your home!

This DIY Flower Artwork is easy to make and the perfect DIY Decor for your home! #DIYDecor #DIYProject

DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler

Note: This blog contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

Does anyone else absolutely hate when your mattress scooches forward and the pillows on your bed fall into the gap between the headboard and the mattress? Just me? 

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

I can’t be alone here, so I came up with a simple headboard mattress gap filler to keep pillows from falling behind the bed. 30 minutes and a few scrap 2x4 pieces is all you need. Alternatively, you could pay a small fortune for this super gimmicky mattress wedge. Guess which one I chose?

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler

So, full disclosure, this gap filler technically goes between the foot board and the mattress, not the headboard and the mattress. It pushes the mattress all the way up to the headboard so that the gap doesn't occur at all. Win.

Materials
  • Scrap 2x4 Pieces (probably two 8' lengths worth, if you're buying it new)
  • 2 1/2" Wood Screws
  • Pocket Hole Screws/Jig OR Angle Brackets
Step 1: Check Pieces and Determine Measurements

I started by checking to see if the 2x4 would fit between my foot board and the box spring. It did, so I opted to have the structure span the entire distance between the top of the foot board and bed frame below. If it hadn’t fit, I would have made a shorter structure that rested on top of the box spring. Do what best fits your bed.

I also measured the length of the space (58”) and determined the cuts of my pieces based on that. I've provided my measurements below, but once again, do what best fits your bed.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject
Step 2: Cut All Pieces

I used a miter saw, but this is a pretty basic project that doesn’t really require precision. A circular saw or even a jigsaw (although this would be slow going) would work as well.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject
Step 3: Build Left Half

I added two 2 1/2” wood screws at each joint to form a rectangle as shown below.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject
Step 4: Build Right Half

The right half won’t be able to connect to the left half with normal screws, since the opposite side is inaccessible. There are two options. If you have a pocket hole jig, you can add pocket holes to the two longer pieces, and connect that way. This is what I’ve chosen to do. Otherwise, you can put an angle bracket at each joint.

If using pocket holes, drill two pocket holes into one end of each of the long pieces before starting to assemble.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

Secure the two longer pieces to the remaining short piece with 2 1/2” wood screws.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

Then attach the right half to the left half using either pocket hole screws or angle brackets.

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

Place the structure between the mattress and the foot board, and enjoy!

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject
Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

It's super nice to not constantly be losing pillows to the gap between the headboard and the mattress. And considering this took less than 30 minutes to make, I consider it a win! If you do too, be sure to save this post to Pinterest so others can find it too! And if you end up making this, please tell me how it goes in the comments below!

Wondering how to keep pillows from falling behind your bed? Check out this easy DIY Headboard Mattress Gap Filler, made from scrap wood pieces! Done in under 30 minutes, it's the perfect fix to your problem! #ScrapWoodProject

7 Genius Pinterest Ornaments I Tried Myself!

One of my favorite parts of the holiday season is crafts! So many cute, seasonal things to make! So, each year, I spend at least one evening making ornaments, sometimes with friends, sometimes by myself, depending on the year. This year I picked seven of my favorites on Pinterest, and gave them a shot. Here's how they went:

Note: This post contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I may receive compensation (at no additional cost to you.) I only recommend products that I personally use and love, and any support helps keep this little blog going!

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Glass Ornament
- Orange Felt
- Black Spray Paint
- White Acrylic Paint
- Googly Eyes
- Hot Glue and Gun

Admittedly, I didn't follow their instructions at all. I had glass ornaments, and didn't have foam balls, and my frugal self was not about to spend money when I could make a similar craft with what I had. To see how to make the foam ball version, visit A Little ​Craft In Your Day.

​Regardless, my version turned out pretty well anyway. I spray painted my glass ornament using black spray paint, then painted on the white stomach with white acrylic paint. I cut out and glued on the orange feet and nose, then glued on the googly eyes.

Challenges: Cutting out out the feet for the penguin was tedious and required sharp scissors (I used my fabric scissors.) Spray painting the ornaments was also annoying - it's difficult to cover everything without spray painting your hands too. Overall, though, the penguins were super cute and made me forget all about the irritating parts.

Overall Rating:

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Glass Ornaments
- Toddler Socks
- Scissors
- White Acrylic Paint
- String
- Black and Orange Sharpies

So pictures of these super cute snowman ornaments have been floating around on Pinterest taunting me for weeks! I finally got around to buying some toddler socks, and making the ornament. I followed the instructions pretty much exactly; the instructions start at about the 4:50 minute mark in the youtube video linked above.

This was easy enough to make, even with my mediocre snowman face drawing skills. However, I was seriously saddened by the fact that the snowman face, no matter what I did, was on the bottom of the ornament. If you hang it on a tree, it needs to go at the top so that you can see the face! Otherwise, you'd see a sock covering most of an ornament, which was not what I was going for. 

Challenges: None. This was super easy.​

Overall Rating:

The Clothespin Snowflake Ornament, by ??? (aka, pretty much everyone)
These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Wooden Clothespins
- Wood Glue
- Spray Paint
- Snowflake Button Things
-String

So, full disclosure, I actually made these two years ago, hence why I have no idea where I found them. I tried to hunt the blog down, but there are so many people who have blogged about these ornaments that I really have no clue. Regardless, they were such an ornament win that I had to include them.

The general idea is that you glue a bunch of wooden clothespins together (I used wood glue,) spray paint them, and then put some sort of cute thing in middle to cover up the glue spot. I used some snowflake buttons. The ones I used are no longer available, but these look pretty similar.

They're the easiest things to make, and two years later, they're still alive and brightening up my tree. The wood glue has weakened in a couple places, and on one of my snowflakes, a "branch" fell off. This was easily fixed with more wood glue.

Challenges: It's a bit tricky to get the clothespins situated with the wood glue in the right spots when you're gluing it all together (without making a total mess, at least.) It's manageable though, and totally worth it!

Overall Rating: 

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Wooden Blocks
- Sandpaper
- White Paint
- Small Paint Brush
- Black and Orange Sharpie (or acrylic paint)
- Ribbon (for bow)
- Twine or String (for hanging)
- Screw Eyes
- Hot Glue and Gun
- Drill and 1/16" Drill Bit

These are super cute and don't require any real skill to make, but they take a few more supplies than the other ornaments listed here. A drill is required to add the screw eyes for hanging, and if you're not comfortable with that, this ornament is a non-starter. That said, the result is undeniably adorable, so given you have a couple hours and aren't scared of a drill, they're the perfect craft for a holiday afternoon!

Challenges: Bows have always been difficult for me, so that's the part I struggled with the most. I found a tutorial that was really clear and helped me out, which is linked in the post. Because this is my project. I snuck it in. #sorrynotsorry

Overall Rating:

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Glass Ornament
- Black Spray Paint
- Mod Podge
- Glitter
- Paintbrush
- Something to catch the glitter
- Something to balance the ornament on while it drys (I used a small wine glass)

This looks like the worlds easiest ornament. Spray paint ornament, cover with Mod Podge and glitter, let dry. And it was simple, and my ornaments look decent. But it wasn't the super easy ornament I thought it would be, so I feel like I have the right to complain.

Challenges: Spray painting the ornament evenly without getting covered in paint is difficult. I ended up holding it with a giant paper towel covering my hand. But even then, how do you lay the ornament so that it can dry? I never really figured this out, and all of my ornaments have a small unsightly spot where the ornament rested while it dried (including my penguins from above.)

Then, painting the circle of Mod Podge evenly and not lopsidedly was challenging. Maybe I was just being a perfectionist, but the whole time I was convinced my ornament was going to have glitter higher on one side than the other. Turned out okay anyway, though, so maybe this isn't as hard as it seemed.

Overall Rating:

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need
- Two 3" Embroidery Hoops
- Stain or Spray Paint
- Twine

This is another one of my projects, but I will do my best to be unbiased! It's not going to sound that way though, because these were ridiculously easy to make. Arrange circles. Tighten. Stain/spray paint. It's that easy. If rustic farmhouse is your thing these are the ornaments for you.

Challenges: None. These were super easy.

Overall Rating: 

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

What You'll Need:
- Hot Water
- Salt
- Flour
- Straw
- Paint
- Glitter
- Animal/Pet

So, when I was 11 years old, I begged and begged for a puppy. I made my mom promise me that if I was good for an entire year, we could get a (second) dog.  A year later, I demanded my mother keep her promise (even though I probably wasn't perfect.) And so we found a 1-year-old Kiki at the local SPCA. Fast forward 15 years, and Kiki is, by some miracle, still with us. At 16 years old, she's a little slow, and not very good at climbing stairs, but still a pretty happy dog. 

Since all bets are off on how much longer Kiki will still be with us, I was determined to get her paw print on an ornament this Christmas. I now also have a cat, Penny, who joined us for this adventure. It was easy enough to mix up the dough, roll it out and cut out the circles. It was not so easy to get suitable paw prints on the dough.

I realized quickly that Kiki's ability to stand on three paws instead of four is pretty much gone, so getting a paw print while she's standing was near impossible. My dad ended up picking her up and holding her while we pressed the dough into her paw. Poor Kiki was terrified, and I felt awful. 

Penny, on the other hand, saw this commotion going on and immediately ran to hide under my bed. I had to lure her out with food and then hold her wiggling, protesting self while we shoved her paw into the ornament. Penny doesn't really bite or scratch, so this wasn't dangerous, but if you have a more ornery cat I could see you taking a major risk with your arms here. Also, I felt a bit bad. Not that much, since I then gave her the fancy canned food that I lured her out with, but a little.

Challenges: Getting a decent pet paw-print, and not feeling guilty that you're manhandling your pet into this situation. Not for geriatric pets.

Overall Rating:

Final Thoughts

Honestly, when I went on this mission, I was hoping/expecting to have some sort of major #PinterestFail moment, and it never happened. I'm almost disappointed, but on the bright side, that means there are now 7 tried and tested ornament crafts for you explore this holiday! Give them a shot! And if you do, let me know how it turns out! Did I miss anything? is there something I should add? Let me know in the comments below!

Finally, if you found this post useful and/or entertaining, please save it to Pinterest so other people can find it too!

These 7 DIY Christmas Ornaments are genius - I know, because I made them myself! The perfect Pinterest Ornaments to get you started this holiday season! #DIYOrnaments #Crafts

DIY Cross Ornament

Side effect of making my own DIY Bamboo Shades a couple months back: I had a lot of leftover twig pieces. Like, a ton. I could've thrown them out, but my basement is a large, useful storage place, so I stuck them in a box and put them off to the side in hopes they could be useful eventually. 

That day has come. Twig ornaments are a thing. Most people have to scrounge around in their backyard to find some twigs. I just grabbed the box from the basement. Easy-peasy, and I have enough twigs to make every twig ornament my heart has ever dreamed of.

First up: this super easy DIY Cross Ornament. Done in 5 minutes or less, given your glue gun heats up in less than five minutes. Because that's the longest part...

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments

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DIY Twig Cross Ornament

Materials
  • Twigs
  • Scissors
  • Glue Gun and Hot Glue Sticks
  • Ribbon
Step 1: Cut 6 Twigs

Cut six twigs to be the exact same length.

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments
Step 2: Glue Twigs Together

Arrange three of the twigs on top of the other three twigs so that they form a cross shape. Glue in place.

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments
Step 3: Make and Attach Bow

Tie a bow (I like these bows,) and glue it in place on top of the cross.

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments
This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments

Attach string and you're done! Super easy ornament, no?

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments

Definitely worth the 5 minutes of time it took to make!

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments

If you're a fan of simple and easy DIY ornaments, make sure you save this post to Pinterest! And if you're looking for more projects, check out my DIY Embroidery Hoop Ornaments, and Simple Cardboard Flower Ornament!

This easy DIY Cross Twig Ornament is an easy 5-minute craft for your Christmas tree! #crafts #DIYOrnaments
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