Simple Snowman Wooden Block Ornaments

Guess what everyone? It snowed this weekend! Now, as someone who hasn't lived somewhere that gets snow in about a decade, I was pretty excited. Not only because of the snow, but because for the first time in ages, it actually felt like Christmas. I can't be the only one whose childhood programmed them to only feel Christmas-y when it's cold and snowing outside, right?

Now, full disclosure, it's actually mid-November. Not exactly Christmas, yet. But I wasn't about to let the Christmas spirit totally pass me by, so I spent the day making these super cute snowman ornaments.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments

These snowmen are super cute and easy, and are made mostly with supplies DIY-ers already had around the house. I picked up some wooden blocks from Home Depot, but that was it!

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

Snowman Block Ornaments
Materials

- Wooden Blocks- I got a set of eight from Home Depot for around 3 dollars. I'm sure you could find them at most craft stores (as well as Amazon!)

- Sandpaper- I used 120 grit and 220 grit sandpaper, but combo of a medium and fine grit sandpaper would probably be fine.

- White Paint- I used acrylic craft paint since I had it around the house, but honestly, latex or spray paint would probably be fine too.

- Small Paint Brush

- Black and Orange Sharpie (or acrylic paint)- I used a sharpie to draw the face on, because I thought I'd have better control with a pen than I would with paint, but either would probably work.

- Ribbon (for bow)

- Twine or String (for hanging)

- Screw Eyes- I have these tiny ones left over from another project. They were perfect for this, but if you only have larger ones, they'd probably be fine too.

- Hot Glue and Gun

- Drill and 1/16" Drill Bit- For drilling a pilot hole for the eyelet screw. 

Step 1: Paint the Blocks

I painted all of the blocks with two coats of white acrylic paint. The paint dries super fast, so with actually went pretty quickly.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments
Step 2: Sand the Blocks

I wanted to have a little bit of contrast around the face of the snowmen, so I sanded all the edges on all the blocks with 120 grit sandpaper. This was definitely the most time consuming step, and honestly, probably doesn't make that big of a difference in the final product, so you could probably skip it if you're short on time.

I also sanded the faces of the blocks with 220 grit sandpaper, since they felt a bit bumpy. I would recommend doing this- it goes fast, and makes the blocks seem much nicer.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments

 Do you see how wood is visible at the edges of the blocks? That's from my sanding!

Step 3: Draw/Paint the Faces

I had both black and orange acrylic paint and Sharpies. I ultimately decided to use the Sharpies, because I thought I'd have better control over it, however I think the paint is definitely an option if you have small brushes and are somewhat skilled at painting.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments
Step 4: Add Screw Eyes

I started by drilling a single, tiny pilot hole in the top of each snowman. I just eyeballed the center- no need to measure.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments

Then I screwed (by hand) the screw eyes into each of the holes.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments
Step 5: Add Twine or String

Thread a 8-10 inch piece (I eyeballed this too...) into the screw eye and tie a knot. I wanted the knot to stay at the screw eye, so I secured it there with some hot glue. 

Step 6: Make and Add Bow

If you're thinking "oh no, I'm terrible at making bows," it's okay, me too. Every time I go to make a bow, it turns out crazy. But for these, I followed this handy 4-step process by Better Home and Gardens, and they turned out at least semi-cute.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments

To add the bow, I simply secured it to screw eye with hot glue.

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments

While I haven't put up my tree yet, I am now super excited to do so! The snowmen will look so cute! I plan to put a couple on my tree, and give the rest away as Christmas gifts. While I don't have any kids of my own, as a former teacher, I think these would be an awesome holiday teacher gift for those of you looking for ideas! If you make them, let me know what you do with them in the comments!

These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments
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These super cute DIY snowman block ornaments are an easy craft to make and will look great on your Christmas tree! Full tutorial shows you step by step how to complete the project! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYCrafts #DIYProjects #ChristmasCrafts #ChristmasDecor #DIYOrnaments #DIYChristmasOrnaments
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How I Closed the Space Above My Cabinets

I've mentioned a couple times before how crazy my walls are, like when I opened a wall or tiled my backsplash. In summary, sometimes they're drywall, sometimes they're plaster, sometimes they're drywall on plaster- you never know. As a result, my walls look funny. They're wavy, joint compound is visible in weird spots, they change width randomly, things like that. Because of this, I was super excited about the idea of extending my cabinets to the ceiling. Less visible wall = prettier house.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

I was also super nervous about this project. It seems simple: cut up MDF and attach it above the cabinets. Done. But then there was the trim, and the caulk, and the paint, and it just seemed like so much work. So I procrastinated. For over a month, if you were wondering. 

But then it all worked out, because guess who appeared? My dad! I'd put a cape on him if I could, because he's kind of a hero in that I'm not sure this blog would exist without his long-distance DIY consultations. But for this project, I had him in person! The best part about this: he said if I closed up the area above the sink in this project, he could bring down electricity from the attic and add a recessed light! Win!

And so with that, we got started!

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

The Cabinet Extension Project
Materials

- Two 4' x 8' pieces of MDF
- Eight pieces of 7 foot trim, two different types
- Caulk
- Six 1" x 2" furring strips
- Construction Adhesive
- Brad Nails
- Paint and Primer

Step 1: Add Furring Strips Above Cabinets

The MDF pieces need to be secured to something. Since that something won't be seen, I used furring strips, AKA, the cheapest wood on the market. I attached the strips to the tops of the cabinets and the ceiling using construction adhesive and brad nails. Since the pieces were so light, I didn't worry about attaching them to the ceiling joists; the construction adhesive alone was more than enough to hold them up.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

I used a scrap piece of MDF to determine how far back to place the furring strips, and ensure the ceiling furring strips were aligned with the lower ones.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel
Step 2: (Optional) Configure Any Lighting

As mentioned above, my dad brought down electricity from the attic to power a recessed light over the sink. I'm not going to go into detail about how he did that, but if you have someone with the electrical skills to add lights for you, it's an awesome improvement!

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

The Romex wiring got hidden behind the MDF when I closed up the space, hence why the light had to be installed first!

Step 3: Cut and Attach MDF

I had Lowes cut my MDF pieces to be 12 1/2" x 8' long. While the distance between my cabinets and ceiling was 12 1/2" in some places, it was shorter in others, so in addition to cutting the MDF to the correct length using my miter saw, I also had to cut the pieces lengthwise so they fit between the cabinets and ceiling perfectly.

I used my circular saw to make the longer cuts. In order to make the cuts as accurate and straight as possible, I used this nifty jig developed by Kreg that helps keep my circular saw going in a perfectly straight line. I love it; if you don't have a table saw and regularly need to make long, accurate cuts with your circular saw, I highly recommend getting one.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

I attached the MDF to the furring strips with brad nails and construction adhesive. The weight of the MDF pieces was mostly held by the cabinets, so I didn't feel I needed to use screws to keep the pieces in place.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

For the space over the corner cabinets, I installed the MDF on either side first. I did not bevel those cuts, instead cutting them as normal.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

Then I cut a piece to fit the space left. This piece had a 45 degree bevel on each end.

Step 4: Add Trim

I added trim on both the top and bottom of the MDF pieces in order to hide any gaps resulting from the fact my ceiling wasn't perfectly level. I secured the pieces with construction adhesive and brad nails.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel
Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

If your corners aren't perfect, don't fret. You'll add caulk on the next step, which hides any gaps, and does a great job of making work look professional.

Step 5: Caulk All Gaps

Caulk is like my secret super power. Suddenly projects that were looking a little wonky look 100% better after caulk is added to any gaps. On this project, I went through and added caulk to all corners, the space in between the trim and MDF, and anywhere else I could see a gap. It makes everything so much better, so if you were thinking of skipping this step, don't!

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel

I also added wood filler to any holes created by the brad nails so that they wouldn't be visible after painting.

Step 6: Prime and Paint

Something to know about MDF: it is thirsty! I think this is some snazzy slang term used by high schoolers, but what I actually mean by it is that the MDF will quickly soak up any paint you add. If you paint the MDF without priming first, you will need 4-5 coats. Because of this, I highly recommend priming before you add any paint. I did two coats of Zinsser Primer before painting.

Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel
Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel
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Ever wanted to make your kitchen seem taller and classier? See this complete tutorial on how to close up the area above your kitchen cabinets! #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement #Kitchen #KitchenProjects #KitchenRemodel
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How to Add Seating in a Tiny Kitchen

The entire time I've been planning my kitchen, I've had one reoccurring thought: where will I eat? The kitchen is TINY; there really isn't room for a set of table and chairs anywhere in the space. After finishing the countertop installation, I had some leftover butcherblock, and that was when I had the idea of a bar! I could use the leftover butcherblock to make a bar! 

Before installing the bar, my kitchen looked like this:

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

Keep in mind this is mid-remodel, so don't judge just yet!

I figured I could fit a small bar against the right side of the kitchen. It would have to be small, and the barstools would have to fit entirely under the bar when not in use, but it was do-able, and would add at least a little seating to the kitchen!

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

I started with the two pieces of butcherblock in the picture below. The shorter piece is 14 1/2" tall. I decided to cut a 14 1/2" piece off the bigger piece of butcherblock, and then put the two pieces next to each other to form the bar. While I could have cut one long piece from the bigger butcherblock, I was concerned it wouldn't be long enough to comfortably seat two, plus it would have required having an exposed cut end. After cutting with a circular saw, the cut ends weren't super pretty, so I wanted to avoid that.

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

Once I had the pieces cut to be identical, I installed them using these shelf brackets. They were heavy duty and claimed to support up to 600 lbs per pair, which I hoped would mean they'd securely support the bar and everything I put on it. While I wouldn't sit on the bar, normal weighted things seem pretty secure so far.

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

I have crazy plaster covered in drywall walls, so I purchased extra long 3 1/2" screws to secure my shelf brackets to the studs. Since I was putting up four brackets, I wasn't able to get every single bracket into a stud: on one bracket, the screws attach to these molly anchors instead. While I had some concerns about the mollys holding the weight of the bar, I figured that since there was another shelf bracket that was secured to a stud, things would be fine. I haven't had any issues so far!

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

Molly anchor in wall!

Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces
Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces

All in all, I absolutely love having a seating area in the kitchen. It's great to not have to carry my meal into the dining room every time I want to sit down. I'm enjoying it a lot. I'm also completely obsessed with the barstools and the mirror, go see how build them if you haven't already!

Like this idea? Save it to Pinterest!
Come see how I added a small seating area to my tiny kitchen! Complete tutorial of how to add the bar to a small space, with links to building the barstools and farmhouse mirror! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Bar #Kitchen #FarmhouseKitchen #SmallSpaces
Want to see how the rest of the kitchen turns out? Make sure you're following me on Pinterest!

DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror

After building my bar (stay tuned for the reveal!), I was left with a large space of wall above the bar that needed something. Artwork would have been ideal, but what? It's a kitchen, and I wanted to keep the colors simple; just yellow and white. I'm also apparently super picky about words on my art, and as I looked at kitchen pieces, I just didn't see anything I loved.

Eventually, I came to the idea of a mirror! It's close to the back door, so it's nice for the purpose of checking your appearance on the way out the door. Plus, it's a pretty small kitchen, so adding a mirror along the wall would help expand the appearance of the space. 

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

The Rustic Farmhouse Kitchen Mirror
Materials

- 1 x 3 Furring Strip (or other type of wood)
- Sisal Twine
- Dollar Store Sunflowers
- 2' x 3' Frameless Mirror
- Kreg Jig and Screws
- Stain
- Wood Conditioner (optional, use if using a soft wood)
- Mirror Clips- Make sure you get the right size for the mirror that you purchased. My mirror was 1/4" thick, and I made sure the clips I was purchasing were intended for 1/4" mirrors.

Step 1: Make Frame

I was using some leftover furring strips from my kitchen tool organizer project, so the wood was already sanded. If you purchased a furring strip for this project, it'll involve a fair amount of sanding to make it pretty. I typically sand with 120 grit sandpaper on a belt sander, then smooth with 180 grit sandpaper on an orbital sander. Alternatively, you could pay a dollar or two more for nicer wood and skip the sanding.

I cut two pieces to be 37 7/8" long and two pieces to be 21" long, then tested the fit with the mirror I purchased to ensure the clips and mirror would fit appropriately on the frame.

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On the two smaller pieces, I added two Kreg Jig holes on either end of the piece.

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Then I assembled the frame using Kreg Jig screws and wood glue. Note the clamp in the picture below: it is super important to clamp your wood anytime you're assembling with pocket holes (the kreg jig holes). 

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Step 2: Stain Frame

Since I was using furring strips, aka, super soft wood, I coated the entire frame in wood conditioner before starting. Then I stained with Minwax's English Chestnut, which I had around the house.

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Step 3: Add Twine

I secured the end of the twine to the frame using hot glue, then wrapped the twine around the frame until I had about 6 inches of twine. 

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts

I did this four separate times, two times in two opposing corners.

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Step 4: Add Sunflowers

I cut four sunflowers off of a dollar store sunflower bouquet, and hot glued one onto each bunch of twine.

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Step 5: Attach Mirror to Frame

I started by attaching the mirror clips to the back side of the frame. I had three clips on the bottom piece of the frame, two on the top piece, and one clip on the right side of the frame. It is really, important that one side of the frame does not have any clips!! This is so that you can slide the mirror into place.

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The pack of mirror clips did not come with screws, so I attached to clips to the frames with #6 1/2" wood screws.

Then I slid the mirror into place, and hung it on the wall!

Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
Cost Considerations

Most of the typical woodworker supplies I had around the house- the frame was built from scrap wood, the twine I had left over from my doormat project, and I typically keep things like stain, wood conditioner, wood glue, and screws around the house. As a result, I only purchased the following things; if you make replicate this project, it may cost a bit more if you need to purchase more things. That being said, you might be able to cut down on the cost of the mirror by finding one at a thrift store that you could recycle- I wasn't patient enough to try!

Item
Place Purchased
Cost

Lowes

$23.73

Amazon

$8.79

1 Bunch Sunflowers

Dollar Tree

$1.00

Total
$33.52
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Need some simple wall decor? Take a look at this DIY Farmhouse Sunflower Mirror! Full tutorial shows you how to make a mirror frame out of scrap wood, dollar store sunflowers, and twine. #AButterflyHouse #FarmhouseDecor #Farmhouse #Twine #ScrapWoodProjects #DIY #DIYProjects #Kitchen #Mirror #DIYDecor #DollarStoreCrafts
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How I Built Barstools From Scratch

In an ideal world, every single piece of furniture in my house would be something I transformed from a thrift store piece. Why? Because this is the single least expensive way to create beautiful furniture. In my head exists an "expense hierarchy." With a few low-quality exceptions, purchasing furniture new will always be the most expensive option. The cost of building furniture yourself adds up quickly, but typically still comes out cheaper than buying something new. Finally, given your initial purchasing cost is low, transforming a thrift store piece is typically the most affordable option.

My DIY barstools are a perfect example of this. I searched thrift stores for about a month looking for barstools to transform. I saw plenty of barstools. The typical price per barstool was $25; occasionally I'd see something for a little more or less. However, I was looking for something very particular: a small backless barstool that would fit completely under the 14" wide bar I was building in my kitchen.

Eventually, I ran out of time. I wanted these barstools done and over with, so when I saw spindles at my Habitat For Humanity for a dollar each, I picked up 8, deciding to make the barstools myself using the spindles as legs.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

Note: This page contains affiliate links for your convenience. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

I thought I could pull off $8 barstools. I had some leftover butcherblock from my countertops at home that could be the tops. And maybe if I had stuck with that idea, they would have been $15 barstools after purchasing some furring strips for support. But halfway through the project, I decided there was already enough wood in the kitchen, and I should go with a fabric top instead. But adding cushions costs money, so the cost of my $15 barstools rapidly shot up. Here's what I ended up paying:

Item
Cost
Comments

8 Spindles
Habitat For Humanity

$8.00

$2.64

Furring strips are super cheap, but involve significant amounts of sanding to make them usable.

$3.36

Spray Adhesive
Home Depot

$5.77

This is the cheapest spray adhesive I could find, and it was actually plenty strong! I was pleased.

$3.87

Saving Money Secret: do your first couple coats with a cheaper spray paint (I had some that I got for $0.99 at Menards a while back), then the final coat in the nice spray. You get the look of the nicer white without having to purchase multiple cans.

1.5 Yards Fabric
Jackman's Fabrics

$18.00

Jackman's is a local fabric store in the St. Louis area. They have a great selection, and are worth checking out if you live in the area!

$13.99

Yes, I used lots of coupons.

2 Yards Batting
Joann Fabrics

$7.14

N/A

Already Owned

Butcherblock

N/A

Staples for Staple Gun

N/A

Total
$62.77

This wasn't as cheap as I wanted, but I feel a bit better when I remind myself that if I had remodeled thrift store barstools, it probably would have cost me $15 in supplies in addition to the $50 base barstool cost.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
DIY Spindle Barstools: The Tutorial

In addition to the materials above, you'll need the following tools:
- Belt Sander (if using furring strips)
- Miter Saw
- Drill/Driver
- Orbital Sander
- Pocket Hole Jig
- 24" Clamps
- Circular Saw
- Rotary Cutter/ Electric Knife
- Staple Gun

Step 1: Prep and Cut Wood

Since I used furring strips, I needed to sand them significantly to make them usable. I used 120 grit sandpaper on a belt sander to take most of the rough wood off, then smoothed it out using 180 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander.

Then I cut my wood to the proper lengths. Since I was aiming for my barstools to be 20" wide by 14" deep, and each furring strip was 1 1/4" thick, I cut my furring strips to be 17 1/2" and 11 1/2" long. See picture below.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

These are the supports for ONE barstool.

Additionally, the spindles I purchased were 36" long. This would make a pretty high barstool- ideally, bar-height barstools are between 30 and 32 inches high. I therefore cut my spindles down to be 30 inches long. Since I had three and a half inches of cushion/butcherblock top, this was still a really high barstool, so if you can cut your barstool down further, or have a thinner top, it would work out better.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

I was super careful to make all four spindles the exact same length. Should I be off at all, the barstool would wobble once put together.

Step 2: Add Kreg Jig Holes to Supports

On my 1 x 3 support pieces, I added two kreg jig holes on each end of the piece to attach the supports to the spindles. I also added two or three kreg jig holes (depending on length of piece) facing up that would eventually attach the butcherblock top to the supports. 

On the 1 x 2 support pieces, I just added one hole on each end, which would attach the supports to the spindles.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
Step 3: Assemble Barstool Base

I started by assembling one side of the base at a time, then connecting them. 

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

There are a couple of things in the above picture that are pretty important. First of all, make sure that you clamp the pieces together before putting in the Kreg screws, else there will be a lot of movement, and you'll risk splitting your spindles. Additionally, you'll want to secure your joints with wood glue for extra support (do this before clamping!). Finally, in my picture, you can see that I've lined up all three pieces of wood against a cabinet door. This is to make sure they are all in a straight, level line with each other.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

After creating the two smaller sides, I attached them using the remaining furring strips.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
Step 4: Finish Base

I wood filled and sanded the pocket holes on the lower supports so they wouldn't be seen (I didn't bother with the top holes; they wouldn't be visible on the final barstool,) then spray painted the base white. 

When spray painting, I started with some cheaper white spray paint that I got for $0.99, then finished with Rustoleum's 2X White Semi-Gloss paint. This was a cost saving measure- by spraying with the cheaper spray paint for the initial cover job, I didn't have to purchase more than one of the more expensive Rustoleum cans.

Step 5: Make Cushion

While waiting for the spray paint to dry, I made my cushion. I started by cutting my leftover butcherblock to be the width and depth I wanted my finished barstool to be, 20" wide x 14" deep. 

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

I then cut my foam to be the same dimensions using a rotary cutter. This wasn't the ideal tool: an electric knife is the correct tool for cutting foam, but I didn't want to purchase one of those, so I made due with the rotary cutter I already had.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

After cutting my foam, I secured it to the butcherblock using spray adhesive.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

Then I wrapped it in batting (like a present!) and secured with foam adhesive. On the first cushion I made, I used two layers of batting, but that seemed like overkill, so on the second I only used one.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

Finally, I wrapped the entire butcherblock/foam/batting combo with the fabric I'd picked out, and secured it with staples from my staple gun. I used 5/16" and 1/4" staples I already had around the house.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

And then my cushion was ready to be attached!

Step 6: Attach Cushion to Base

I had the perfect tiny TV table that I used for this, which made clamping the base to the cushion much easier. Since the cushion compresses as you clamp, it's great to be able to secure it on all four sides.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

Then I screwed in all the Kreg screws into the holes I created earlier.

To add extra support, I put one corner brace on each spindle leg. I started this while my barstool was still clamped, adding the screws that went into the butcherblock, then unclamped the barstool and placed it on the ground to add the screws going into the spindles. This allowed me to always screw down, which is significantly easier than screwing sideways or up.

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
Step 7: Enjoy Your Barstool

All done!!

Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture

I love my barstools! I think they add a pop of color to the kitchen, plus they're super functional and give me an eat-in kitchen!

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Complete tutorial of how I built two barstools for my kitchen from scratch using leftover butcherblock and spindles from Habitat for Humanity. #AButterflyHouse #DIYFurniture #Barstools #DIY #DIYProjects #Furniture
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How I Made a Mudroom Out of a Tiny Space

I'm a big believer in mudrooms. When I redid my entryway in my California condo, it completely changed how my home functioned. Things were put away as I walked in the door, instead of scattered throughout my kitchen and living area. I was an organized human. I always knew where my keys were. Things were good.

So therefore, one of my primary goals after buying a new home was making a mudroom. Since I always entered at the back door, the mudroom was really more of a small mud-area (this is a terrible name; Lets go with "drop zone,") off the kitchen. Regardless, I thought I could make it work.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

There was a door to the basement across from the exterior wall. It needed space to fully open, so I only had about 10" from the exterior wall to play with. This meant no benches or "lockers" or other bulky things. Knowing this, I started my plan.

I first listed out all the things I wanted to store in the space. The list below is specifically for the exterior wall; I had another list for the tool organizer.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

I then thought about how it would be best to store these things. Coupons and receipts could go in a file organizer, while gloves and scarves would be better off in a box. Jackets, keys, and my purse could all go on hooks. I also wanted a shoe area to store my most used shoes.

I then drew out a design. I tried to draw it to scale (I'm kind of obsessed with graph paper spiral notebooks!), but ended up making minor changes to the positioning as I mounted things on the wall. I also erased things lots of times (you can see it in the picture below,) clearly I'm indecisive.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

Once I had a decent draft, it was time to begin!

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

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Small Space Drop Zone
Materials

- Beadboard, cut to size
- Piece of trim, cut to size
- Construction Adhesive
- Piece of wood
- Hooks
- File Organizers- You can see the full tutorial here. On the third and fourth organizers, I used straight instead of angled sides. This resulted  in the gloves/scarves box and the shoe box.
- Tool Organizer- Super proud of how this turned out. You can see the full tutorial here.
- Brad Nails
- Welcome Home Sign

Step 1: Attach the Beadboard

I had my beadboard cut to the size I wanted (36 3/4" by 56") at Home Depot, so it was super easy to just put some construction adhesive on the back and nail it to the wall. As an exciting side note, I got this four pack of Titebond adhesive at Menards for 99 cents after rebate. I was super pumped about this, and have made a mental note that it sometimes goes on crazy sale. If you live by a Menards, take note!

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

I also added screws where I knew I would be putting trim, and made sure these screws hit the studs. I did this because I knew I'd be attaching things to the beadboard, and I wanted to make sure that the beadboard could bear the weight of the accessories.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement
Step 2: Attach the Trim

I cut my trim to the same length as the beadboard (36 3/4") and attached it to the beadboard with construction adhesive and brad nails. 

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement
Step 3: Caulk, Wood Fill, and Paint Beadboard

Caulk works miracles people. In my opinion, lack of caulk is the biggest indicator of a DIY project, so I made sure to fill in all my gaps (sides, bottom, and top) with caulk. Additionally, I wood filled all of the brad nail holes with wood filler so that they wouldn't be seen. I then painted the beadboard.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

After painting!

Step 4: Add Organizers

I went into detail on different ways to attach the organizers in the file organizer post, but in this situation I attached the small organizers with brad nails and construction adhesive, and the larger organizers with screws that I later disguised with paint. I was able to get at least one screw for the shoe box and the wood hook piece into a stud, which was ideal since both of these boxes might hold heavier things at some point.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement
Cost Considerations
Item
Cost

$20.27

$3.78

$0.99

$8.44

N/A; I used scrap wood I already had!

$39.22

Total

$72.70

Less than $100 for a fully function entryway, and more than half of that was for the tool organizer! I consider that an organizational win!

Final Thoughts

It's amazing how much more organized a functional entryway makes me feel. I keep all my project receipts in folders in one of the file organizers, so that I'm ready to take back anything I don't use. I'm so much less worried about losing them now; it's crazy.

Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement

I love my new entryway! Have you ever done a project that makes you feel 100% more organized? Let me know about it in the comments!

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Come see all the details about how I turned a tiny corner into an organized storage area. This DIY mudroom project keeps the whole back of the house clean. #AButterflyHouse #Entryway #Mudroom #StorageIdeas #Organization #Beadboard #DIY #DIYProjects #HomeImprovement
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Welcome Home DIY Wall Decor

I love sunflowers. I'd say they're my favorite flower, but I don't feel like I actually know enough about flowers to make that determination. In fact, sunflowers might be the only flower I can actually identify, which might be part of why I like them.

Regardless, I like sunflowers. And in case you missed the memo, summer and fall are sunflower season, at least when it comes to floral decor stores. I'm assuming they grow in summer and fall in real life too, but, as mentioned, not a flower connoisseur here.

As a result, when I stop by Joann's, I tend to walk through the decor section admiring all the pretty sunflowers. I don't buy anything, because I'm willing to settle for whatever's left at the end of the season when everything is crazy marked down, but I window shop in the meantime. And on one of my most recent trips, I saw this:


I specifically loved the sunflower sign in the middle, although the lady standing next to me liked the pumpkin welcome signs. 

I really liked the middle sunflower sign, but I walked away. Why? Because that was $30 for something I could make out of scrap wood. But the idea stuck in my head, and when I needed something for the space above my mudroom, I knew this would be perfect!

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

"Welcome Home" DIY Scrap Wood Sign
Materials

- Scrap Wood

- Removable Sticker Paper- If you use my method, you'll need paper that can be printed on the back removable, non-sticky side. I used this paper, and was quite please with how it turned out.

- Two Sunflowers- I got a bouquet of sunflowers at the dollar store (for a dollar!) and just cut off two of them.

- Stain

- Kreg Jig/Screws or Tie Plate- I used my Kreg Jig and screws to connect my two pieces of wood together, but if you don't have a Kreg Jig, no biggie. Something similar to this tie plate can be used on the back side of the wood to hold the two pieces together. If you do this, make sure to put wood glue between the pieces of wood for extra support.

- Wood Conditioner- Only necessary if your wood is a soft wood, like pine!

- Hot Glue and Gun OR Liquid Nails- For gluing sunflowers to wood.

- Picture Hangers

Step One: Make the Base

I cut two pieces (to be 30" and 22" long) of out of an old 1"x 6" piece of pine I had around. Then I centered the smaller piece below the larger piece, and connected them using Kreg Jig screws.

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt
Step 2: Stain

Since I was working with pine, it was super important for me to use wood conditioner on the wood first. If you're like past me, and thinking to yourself "that's not really necessary," let me show you what this wood looked like without wood conditioner:

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

If you're working with pine, wood conditioner is mandatory. I'm sorry.

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

Pine boards with wood conditioner!

Since I wasn't super picky about what my wood looked like for this project, I just wanted it to be darker, I used stains I had around the house. I worked my way from lightest to darkest until I was satisfied with the color. I started with Minwax's Early American, then tried Minwax's English Chestnut, then finished with Cece Caldwell's Hickory.

Since I used the wood conditioner, the stains didn't soak in as much as they would have normally, which is why it took me so long (and so many tries!) to get a dark color. And note that, even with wood condition, pine is still hard to stain! There are still some blotches on my wood. For whatever reason, I didn't take a picture right after staining, but you can see it in my final product.

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

See where the arrows point? Those are my blotches!

Step 3: Print and Cut Out Letters

You can make this in whatever font and size you want- I used Rancho size 275 . If you want the exact letters and size I used, you can download a really (not) snazzy free PDF here:

Want the letters? Get them below!

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Alternatively, if you just want the font, you can download it from FontSquirrel here. It is free!

When printing, print on the BACK of the sticker paper. This allows you to cut out the letters so that what you stick onto your wood is white. The black ink removable side will get thrown away after you peel off your letter.

Most letters are symmetric, so this technique works. For letters that aren't symmetric, I retraced the letter on a scrap part of the paper, and then cut it out. 

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

See how I retraced the "L"? Because it wasn't symmetric, the L was backwards if I wanted to use the front side of the sticker paper. By retracing, the L will now be the correct direction when placed on my sign.

Step 4: Place Letters and Sunflowers on Sign

I laid the letters out to make sure they were properly spaced, then took the ink backs off and stuck them onto the sign.

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

For the sunflowers, I glued them using a hot glue gun. That being said, if I'd had any clear liquid nails around, I would have used that instead. It would have created a much stronger bond.

Step 5: Hang Sign

I put these weird little "push in" picture hangers I had around on the back of the sign. I didn't trust the "push in" mechanism, so I also added some screws to make sure the hanger wasn't going to budge.

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt

Then I hung my sign!

Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt
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Welcome your family home with this cute DIY farmhouse sunflower sign made from scrap wood and dollar store flowers! This full tutorial shows you exactly how to make this cute sign for your entryway! #AButterflyHouse #Farmhouse #Flowers #DIY #DIYDecor #DIYProjects #Scrapwood #DollarStoreCrafts #WallArt
Want more DIY decor ideas? Follow me on Pinterest!

DIY Adaptable Wall Organizer

When I was planning out the entryway of my new home, it took me forever to decide what would go on the wall next to the basement door. I knew I wanted something to organize my "upstairs tools" aka, small tools I regularly use upstairs and don't want to have to go down to the basement to get every time I need. But what?? It needed to be flat, 3 inches deep or less, else risk blocking the door from opening. Pegboard seemed like the obvious choice. But pegboard seemed so utilitarian, which is good and well for the basement, garage, or craft room, but this organizer was going in my kitchen!! It needed to be attractive as well as functional.

Eventually I came across references to a "french cleat" organizational system. It's apparently a common way that woodworkers organize their workshop. It consists of strips of wood with an angled top nailed to the wall. It looks nice (although I couldn't find any pictures to show you that do it justice), but requires a table saw for the strips, and you have to build each tool holder separately. Um, no thanks.

But the idea of horizontal strips on the wall? I could use that. 

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

Note: This page contains affiliate links. If you click and make a purchase, I will be compensated with no additional cost to you.

The Fake "French Cleat" Wall Organizer
Materials

- 1" x 3" x 8' Furring Strips (4)
- 1" x 2" x 8' Furring Strip (1)
- Wood Glue
- Brad Nails
- 1 inch nails (24)
- Wood Stain (optional) and Finish
- Wood Conditioner
- 3 inch screws (for mounting)
- Belt Sander (Optional: if you don't have a belt sander, purchase higher quality wood so less sanding is necessary)
- Orbital Sander
- Miter Saw
- S-Hooks, for actual organization. These ones fit perfectly for the furring strips; there is exactly 0.78" of space between the "S" metal part. The furring strips are 0.75" thick, so this creates a snug and secure fit.

Step 1: Prep the Furring Strips

I used furring strips because I like saving money and furring strips are quite possibility the cheapest wood on the market. However, furring strips look terrible when you first take them home. So I had a lot of sanding to do. You can minimize this step by buying more expensive wood; pretty much any stainable 1 x 3 will work.

To prep the furring strips, I sanded with a belt sander using 120 grit sandpaper. This quickly smoothed the wood without creating large sanding marks like a lower grit paper would have done. Then I sanded with 150 grit with my orbital sander to smooth everything a little more. It went quickly; I maybe spent 30 minutes sanding my five furring strips.

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

Unsanded furring strip

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

The exact same spot after sanding with the belt sander. After this picture, I sanded with 150 grit sandpaper using my orbital sander.

Step 2: Cut the Furring Strips to Length

I cut my vertical furring strip (the 1 x 2s) into two 46" long pieces and my horizontal furring strips (the 1 x 3s) into twelve 30 and 1/2 inches long pieces using a miter saw. I have this miter saw, which slides and is generally awesome, allowing me to cut up to 24" wide with a little extra work. I highly recommend it if you don't have a miter saw.

Step 3: Paint/Stain and Finish the Furring Strips

Super duper important PSA: furring strips are made of soft, cheap wood. They will stain TERRIBLY unless you coat them in wood conditioner first. Trust me, I tested a scrap piece first, and it was not pretty. So before staining my actual strips, I applied a bunch of wood conditioner.

I painted the two 46" long 1"x 2" pieces white, and stained the twelve 1"x3" pieces with Minwax's English Chestnut stain. I'm apparently super into this stain recently; I've used it on this table, and this organizer, and think both turned out gorgeous, despite taking the stain very differently.

Step 4: Assemble the Organizer

I started by securing the horizontal strips to the white vertical pieces with wood glue and nails. This was not the final way I secured the pieces, just how I started. 

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

You'll note in the above picture that I had pieces of scrap wood between the white pieces at both the top and bottom of the organizer. This was to hold them the same distance apart as I added boards. This way, the strips stayed parallel to each other.

I also had 1.5" spacers between each board to make sure that the spaces were even. See picture below.

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

All the spacers meant that as I laid and secured boards I only needed to think about how much distance was between the end of the board and the white piece, which in my case was 3" on either side.

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

I didn't feel the wood glue/brad nail combo would be enough to hold the boards in place should I actually put anything heavy on the organizer, so I flipped it over and added 1" screws to each "joint" of the organizer. I countersunk these screws using this countersink bit to ensure they didn't stick out and push my organizer further away from the wall. Sidenote: I just got the bit the other day and I love it!! I've used it so many times, and it's made a bunch of projects easier (including this one!) that I'm not sure how I lived without it for so long. It came with four different sizes, and while I haven't used anything other than the #6 bit, I still find it amazing. 

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

These are the holes created by the countersink bit. I was going to take a picture of them with screws in them too, but apparently I was so excited about the countersink bit that I forgot... 

Step 5: Mount Organizer to Wall

You'll mount the organizer with screws that go through the white furring strips into the wall. In an idea world, both furring strips would align with studs. I wasn't able to make this happen; only one of my furring strips aligns with a stud. Since I have plaster walls, on my other furring strip, I made sure at least two of screws hit the wood lath behind the plaster. If you have drywall molly or toggle bolts are an option for mounting that second furring strip.

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

I put three screws through each white furring strip; one on the very top, one in the middle, and one on the bottom. I then painted the screw heads white to disguise them a bit, as shown in the picture above. Note that in the picture above, you can see the screw pretty clearly, but it is a super close up photograph. I promise that once you're 2-3 feet away, the screw is almost invisible unless you know to look for it.

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas

I purchased these bin organizers from Home Depot. I thought this was a great price for three; they're meant for pegboards, but certainly work in this capacity as well. 

See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas
Cost Considerations

The following chart details what I purchased and paid to make this organizer. Note that many of the items I already had around the house, so if you need to purchase items I had, your cost may be more.

Item
Place Purchased
Cost

Home Depot

$6.48

Home Depot

$2.50

Lowes

$12.28

Amazon

$7.99

Home Depot

$9.97

Total

N/A

$39.22
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See how to make an adaptable DIY rustic farmhouse wooden wall organizer with this full tutorial. The organizer can be used to store tools, kitchen supplies, craft supplies, or almost anything else you can think of! #AButterflyHouse #DIY #DIYProjects #Farmhouse #Organization #Garage #Kitchen #StorageIdeas
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Super Simple Scrap Wood Wall Organizer

Lets talk about pine. The wood, not the needles. It's a soft wood, light colored, and almost always the cheapest thing available at the hardware store. I really, really want to love it, as evidenced by the fact it's always the first thing I reach for when I need wood for a project. But this is a mistake. Why? Because pine stains terribly.

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This piece of pine used to be pretty...

I know this. I've learned this lesson already. But despite that, I always buy pine. "It'll be better this time" I tell myself. No. No it wont be. Stop lying to yourself, Lindsay.

For this project, as per usual, I went to the hardware store and purchased a bunch of pine. I went home and made all my cuts. Then I tested the stain. And, as I should have known, it looked terrible (see above.)

So then I stood in my basement brainstorming all the ways I could make this project work without going back to the hardware store. I looked at the birch plywood left over from the kitchen floor. I looked at all the 100 year old trim I pulled down when putting up cabinets. And I decided I could do this.

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DIY Wood Wall Organizer
Build a small, beautiful farmhouse wood wall organizer for your office, mudroom, entryway, garage, or kitchen! This step by step DIY tutorial gives you all the details of how I built my organizer out of scrap wood! #AButterflyHouse #Organizer #WallOrganizer #DIY #DIYProjects #Tutorial #Mudroom #Farmhouse #FarmhouseDecor #ScrapWood
Materials

The following details the materials and cuts I made to complete my organizer. This can totally be adapted to use different materials or to make a different sized organizer. If you're adapting the plan, there are two key aspects: 1) the lengths of the front, back, and bottom are all the length you want your finished organizer to be and 2) the total height of the front needs to be at least an inch less that the full height of the organizer for mounting purposes.

Front: All of my plywood was leftover from my plank plywood floor project, and therefore already cut into 4" strips. As a result, the front and back of my organizer would need to be multiple pieces. For my front, I used 3 pieces of 1/4" birch plywood cut to be 10"x 2". Alternatively, you could use a single piece of something (not pine!!!) that is 10"x 6".

Back: I used 2 pieces of 1/4" birch plywood cut to be 10"x 4". Once again, you could use a single piece of something that was 10"x 8"

Bottom: This was a single piece of birch plywood 10" long. I cut the height to size after assembling the front and sides.

Sides: I sanded all of the paint off some super old trim that was once on my walls, then cut off an 8" piece (the finished height I want my organizer to be). I set my miter saw to be 10" and then cut a piece that looked the right size. Real official, I know.

Wood Glue: I am not a brand snob for this, and typically purchase the cheapest stuff I can find on Amazon whenever I'm running low. Currently, that's this.

Stain: I used Minwax's English Chestnut. Which, in case you were wondering, looks much darker on this table than it does on this project. Different woods take stain differently, so test your stain first!

Nails and Screws: I used my nail gun (see below) to put brad nails in, but you can use an old fashioned hammer and nails as well. Just make sure the nails are small!

Tools Used

Miter Saw- Absolutely essential for this project. While I suppose you could make all your cuts with a circular/jigsaw and a protractor, you will be miserable. I have this miter saw, and it makes me happy every single day.

Brad Nailer- Not essential for this project. You could definitely get away with a hammer and some finish nails. It'd just take a little while. That being said, I love my little electric nail gun, and don't think I could DIY without it.

Random Orbital Sander: I used to have a terrible Harbor Freight sander that my dad got me when I first started DIY-ing. It was awful, and the paper constantly ripped and ​it never seemed to actually sand anything. I now have this one, and it is so much better.

Drill/Driver- For driving screws and drilling pilot holes. 

Step 1: Make Cuts

See the materials section for what cuts to make!

Step 2: Sand, Stain and Finish

I sanded the sides (aka, the former trim) with 80, 150, and 220 grit sandpaper. The plywood I just gave a quick sand with 220 grit sandpaper, because I was nervous about sanding through the veneer. 

I then stained with Minwax's English Chestnut. I choose to stain and finish before I put everything together to ensure I stained everything, plus it was a little neater this way. While you could stain after assembly, I think it would be difficult to reach some of the places inside the organizer, hence my decision to stain before.

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I used Minwax Tung Oil Finish to finish my boards, primarily because I already had some in the house, but also because I just really like it. It's not pure tung oil (which is expensive), but is tung oil based and creates a nice solid, non-sticky finish on my wood projects. You do have to wait 24 hours in between coats, but if you're not in a hurry, it's a great finish.

Step 3: Assemble

I started by attaching the front pieces to the sides of the organizer with wood glue and brad nails. No screws here: this isn't going to be bearing any weight, so the nails and glue should be enough.

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Then I attached the bottom. Same deal: wood glue and brad nails.

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Finally, the backs. These I attached a little differently. Instead of just using wood glue and brad nails, I also used a couple of 1" screws on the top board. This was because the top of the back is what will be mounted on the wall, so I wanted to ensure it was securely attached to the rest of the organizer.

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If you have a countersink bit (I didn't at the time, but got this one from Lowes a few days later) now is the time to use it. If the screw sticks out a bit it will push the organizer away from the wall, which is fine, but not ideal. Since I didn't have a countersink bit, I just pushed really hard with my drill when I was screwing in the screw, and achieved a similar (if not as pretty) effect.

Step  4: Mount

There are two different ways I considered mounting this: 1) with screws or 2) with construction adhesive and brad nails. The first method is sturdier, given that you can get your screw into a stud or are using some sort of molly or toggle bolt. However, you end up having a visible screw that must be disguised in some way. Options include painting the screw a wood-ish color, or countersinking it and wood-filling and staining over it. The wood fill/stain option looks nice, but makes it near-impossible to remove the organizer from the wall, so you better be sure you never, ever need to take it down.

Given that future me might want to someday remove the organizer, I was mounting on a bead board panel, and that I don't plan to put anything heavy into it, I chose to mount using option 2, construction adhesive and brad nails. It was relatively straightforward: put adhesive on back, then attach to wall with brad nails. See picture the picture below for exactly where I placed my nails.

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And that's it! Organizer done! I made two and used one to file receipts as I came in the door, and the other to store coupons from mailers that I might actually use. What would you use an organizer like this for? Tell me in the comments below!

Build a small, beautiful farmhouse wood wall organizer for your office, mudroom, entryway, garage, or kitchen! This step by step DIY tutorial gives you all the details of how I built my organizer out of scrap wood! #AButterflyHouse #Organizer #WallOrganizer #DIY #DIYProjects #Tutorial #Mudroom #Farmhouse #FarmhouseDecor #ScrapWood
Build a small, beautiful farmhouse wood wall organizer for your office, mudroom, entryway, garage, or kitchen! This step by step DIY tutorial gives you all the details of how I built my organizer out of scrap wood! #AButterflyHouse #Organizer #WallOrganizer #DIY #DIYProjects #Tutorial #Mudroom #Farmhouse #FarmhouseDecor #ScrapWood

Stay tuned for how I assembled the mudroom, built the tool organizer on the right, and made the "Welcome Home" sign!

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Build a small, beautiful farmhouse wood wall organizer for your office, mudroom, entryway, garage, or kitchen! This step by step DIY tutorial gives you all the details of how I built my organizer out of scrap wood! #AButterflyHouse #Organizer #WallOrganizer #DIY #DIYProjects #Tutorial #Mudroom #Farmhouse #FarmhouseDecor #ScrapWood
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Installing Tile on Wavy Walls

Lets talk about my new house for a moment. It's one of those houses that people look at and say "oh! It has... character." And it does. At 108 years old, it has some really interesting features, and a number of things that I wish were different.

The number one thing I would change? The walls. Theoretically, they're plaster. However, at some point in the last 108 years, that plaster cracked. Various owners dealt with this in different ways. Some wallpapered. Others slapped joint compound over the crack and repainted, hoping nobody would notice. A couple walls are entirely covered with drywall. One room is coated in wall texture spray stuff to disguise abnormalities.

Needless to say, I get nervous every time I have to do something to the walls. It's like a surprise project. Is the wall plaster? Plaster coated in drywall? Plaster covered with wallpaper and 3 layers of paint? Just drywall, because there apparently used to be a hole in the wall here? Nobody knows.

Adhering a subway tile backsplash to these walls seemed like asking for trouble. I decided to go for it anyway. Due to the fact I had already torn apart half the kitchen, I knew this was a plaster and drywall situation, with wallpaper in some spots but not all. 

DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile

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Here's how I dealt with the fact my wall isn't at all level.

1) Smooth as much of the wall as you can first.

I don't mean call a contractor and have them come in and totally rework your walls. But I did try and get as much of the wallpaper and caulk off the wall before I started tiling. Additionally, I sanded the wall with a course sanding block to try and reduce any sudden bumps. 

2) Choose a smaller tile.

Any curves to your wall will be harder to disguise with a larger tile than a smaller tile. I choose to use this 3"x6" subway tile because it was cheaper, but a 2"x4" tile probably would have been better given my situation. That being said, I'm happy with the way my backsplash turned out, even with the larger tile.

3) Choose a thicker grout line.

The tiles I purchased had built in 1/16" spacers. However, I didn't use them. Instead, I got 1/8" tile spacers and used those to space my tile instead. A larger distance between the tiles is more forgiving to waves in the wall, because it offers more flexibility for bumps and such. Therefore, I avoided the small grout line and used tile spacers to make my grout line larger.

DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile

See the tile spacers between my tiles?!

4) Use tile adhesive to your advantage

Many of the bumps in my wall were smoothed out by the tile adhesive. This means that in some spots the tile adhesive was thicker than in others. This resulted in an ultimately smooth tile finish.

DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile

All in all, my backsplash is finished, and you cannot tell that my wall is actually a wavy mess. Success! 

DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile
DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile
DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile
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DIY tips for installing subway tile backsplash in your kitchen even if your walls are wavy! #AButterflyHouse #Kitchens #Tile #Backsplashes #DIY #Projects #DIYProjects #SubwayTile
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